Wiesenthal


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Wiesenthal

Simon. born 1908, Austrian investigator of Nazi war crimes. A survivor of the concentration camps, he has been active since 1945 in documenting Nazi crimes against the Jews, tracking down their perpetrators, and assisting surviving victims
References in periodicals archive ?
It was co-organized by UNESCO and the Simon Wiesenthal Centre.
The Simon Wiesenthal Center urges the editors to apologize to its readers, the Jewish community and the State of Israel.
As a Jew who survived the Holocaust through both good luck and acts of honor by decent Germans, Wiesenthal, who died in 2005, was an outspoken critic of the idea of the "collective guilt" of the German people, a concept that had been embraced by many Jews immediately after the war.
Shimon Samuels is the director of international relations at the Simon Wiesenthal Centre in Paris and an editor of Antisemitism: The Generic Hatred--Essays in Memory of Simon Wiesenthal (London: Vallentine Mitchell, 2007).
Frank Gehry's exit from the project provides the Wiesenthal Center a face-saving way to reconsider its plans, APN concluded
With an authenticity approved by the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, Dugan portrays the Austrian-born Jew toward the end of his life in "Nazi Hunter - Simon Wiesenthal," on stage Sunday at the Armstrong Theatre in Torrance.
We take what the Simon Wiesenthal Center says very seriously and we will very thoroughly examine the questions brought up by the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
The Simon Wiesenthal Centre plans to release the most-wanted list today and to open a media campaign in South America this summer, highlighting the pounds 243,000 reward for Heim's arrest posted by the centre along with Germany and Austria.
Longtime champion against antisemitism Wiesenthal (1909-2005) is remembered by colleagues from around the world not only in personal tributes, but also articles about antisemitism.
Other speakers included Wiesenthal Center founder Rabbi Marvin Hier and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.
To Pat Lowther," Christine Wiesenthal writes, "goes the dubious if not fatal, distinction of having accrued the most sensationally tragic of contemporary literary reputations" (3).
Wiesenthal, then, entered this fray with no political base, virtually no moral or financial support, and bereft of any professional training in the investigative and legal domains.