Wiesenthal


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Wiesenthal

Simon. born 1908, Austrian investigator of Nazi war crimes. A survivor of the concentration camps, he has been active since 1945 in documenting Nazi crimes against the Jews, tracking down their perpetrators, and assisting surviving victims
References in periodicals archive ?
It was co-organized by UNESCO and the Simon Wiesenthal Centre.
Wiesenthal will also play a key role in the future integration of EMI Music Publishing's international operations, which is subject to regulatory approval.
As a Jew who survived the Holocaust through both good luck and acts of honor by decent Germans, Wiesenthal, who died in 2005, was an outspoken critic of the idea of the "collective guilt" of the German people, a concept that had been embraced by many Jews immediately after the war.
Frank Gehry's exit from the project provides the Wiesenthal Center a face-saving way to reconsider its plans, APN concluded
With the help of the governments of Israel, Austria, German and other nations, Wiesenthal tracked down Nazi criminals including Adolf Eichmann, the "architect of the Holocaust," who organized the deportation of 3 million Jews to extermination camps; Franz Murer, "The Butcher of Wilno"; and Karl Silberbauer, the Gestapo officer who arrested Anne Frank.
We take what the Simon Wiesenthal Center says very seriously and we will very thoroughly examine the questions brought up by the Simon Wiesenthal Center.
The Simon Wiesenthal Centre plans to release the most-wanted list today and to open a media campaign in South America this summer, highlighting the pounds 243,000 reward for Heim's arrest posted by the centre along with Germany and Austria.
Longtime champion against antisemitism Wiesenthal (1909-2005) is remembered by colleagues from around the world not only in personal tributes, but also articles about antisemitism.
Yet soon as the news spread that Simon Wiesenthal had passed away, it was the lead story in every major newspaper and television station around the world.
Wiesenthal handles these dramatic scriptings with a deft hand but is also careful to read the beginning of Lowther's "legacy" quite critically into the earliest reactions to her murder, the reactions of her fellow poets, the eulogizing and the heroising, the laments that are deeply personal because they so often express the felt vulnerability of the poet friend.
As Wiesenthal points out, "Lowther did not experience her twelve-year marriage with the compressed coherence of its retelling"(199), and without access to support services.
The investment to put in a system must be made on the physician side, but the savings are often realized elsewhere administratively, and the doctors don't see any of it," Wiesenthal said, questioning why a fee-for-service doctor would spend $15,000 to $20,000 so an HMO or pharmacy could save money.