Wife of Bath


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Wife of Bath

well-endowed, lusty teller of tales. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales]

Wife of Bath

many marriages form theme of her tale. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Wife of Bath’s Tale]
References in periodicals archive ?
In "The Wife of Bath Speaks in Brixton Market" and "Slam Poem," Breeze respectively re-voices and re-visions--the latter in the sense Adrienne Rich formulated in her landmark essay "When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-Vision" (5)--the "Prologue to the Wife of Bath's Tale" by Geoffrey Chaucer and "Who Am I" by leading Jamaican dance-hall artist Beenie Man (Anthony Moses Davis).
Chaucer's craft is evident through his characterization of the Wife of Bath as narrator in her prologue and tale.
The pilgrims are from all walks of medieval life and include a knight, a miller, a monk, a prioress, a shipman and of course the rather insatiable aforementioned wife of Bath.
First, Ovid appears to be perceived as a literary authority, providing examples of narrative strategies (see Fumo on Chaucer representing the Wife of Bath as a storyteller), and acting as a key to decode figures of speech.
But even a scholar like Benson, the most persuasive critic of the Kittredgean-Lumianskyan dramatic approach to the tales, would concur that the Wife of Bath and the Pardoner are beyond doubt constructed by Chaucer to invite a dramatic approach to their prologues and tales--although he would emphasize that Chaucer's chief interest is more in the words the two speakers use than in their psychological makeup (Benson 44), and in effect it is their words, the text through which Chaucer imagines them creating themselves, that we are stressing in this article.
Gower's friend, Chaucer, too, as Jamie Fumo argues, in his Wife of Bath, among many other instances, deploys Ovidian myth, conflating in his Alison Mercury's intelligence and Io's suffering, creating a narrator who outwits male attempts to control her.
The chapter closes with an analysis of the Wife of Bath as the arch-gossip, who like so much with her character, embodies the extremes of every pastoral complaint about gossip and then takes it to yet a higher level.
Skelton might scamper behind and rub shoulders with the Green Knight and the Wife of Bath.
s exposition of the rich sermonic milieu of the late Middle Ages leads particularly to fresh views on Chaucer's Parson, Pardoner, and above all the Wife of Bath, whose tales explode social boundaries and illuminate the fluidity of roles between the ordinary and extraordinary, the institutional and charismatic, the authorized and unauthorized, male and female, clerical and lay, and so forth.
However, the Wife of Bath definitely refers to the previous utterance by the Pardoner at this place ("sith it may yow like"), and there is a contrast to (189) ("But yet I praye to al this compaignye").
On the other hand, the Wife of Bath seems to live a personal life that is well matched with the sentence of her tale.