Wife of Bath


Also found in: Acronyms.

Wife of Bath

well-endowed, lusty teller of tales. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales]

Wife of Bath

many marriages form theme of her tale. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Wife of Bath’s Tale]
References in periodicals archive ?
That contemporary Jamaican women are still not entirely free from such discursive restraint is suggested by Breeze's response to Sharpe's remarking in the interview "Dub and Difference" on the sexual explicitness of The Arrival of Brighteye and Other Poems, the book in which "The Wife of Bath Speaks in Brixton Market" and "Slam Poem" were originally print published.
Because the way Chaucer captures character in a few deft strokes of his quill is a masterclass in characterisation, veering towards caricature but always retaining a unique individuality: the Miller with his vile bagpipe-playing and coarse mouth; the lusty Squire with his flowery smock; the over-dainty Prioress and her lapdog; the Wife of Bath and her enormous head-dress and red stockings.
But even a scholar like Benson, the most persuasive critic of the Kittredgean-Lumianskyan dramatic approach to the tales, would concur that the Wife of Bath and the Pardoner are beyond doubt constructed by Chaucer to invite a dramatic approach to their prologues and tales--although he would emphasize that Chaucer's chief interest is more in the words the two speakers use than in their psychological makeup (Benson 44), and in effect it is their words, the text through which Chaucer imagines them creating themselves, that we are stressing in this article.
It is tempting to view the discussion of these sixteenth-century texts as a means to "explain" finally how to read the cultural assumptions behind the Wife of Bath.
Chaucer's Wife of Bath was a feminist ahead of her time .
Smethwick-born Julie stripped off for the film Calendar Girls and had onscreen sex as The Wife of Bath in BBC TV's modern day re-working of The Canterbury Tales.
s exposition of the rich sermonic milieu of the late Middle Ages leads particularly to fresh views on Chaucer's Parson, Pardoner, and above all the Wife of Bath, whose tales explode social boundaries and illuminate the fluidity of roles between the ordinary and extraordinary, the institutional and charismatic, the authorized and unauthorized, male and female, clerical and lay, and so forth.
However, the Wife of Bath definitely refers to the previous utterance by the Pardoner at this place ("sith it may yow like"), and there is a contrast to (189) ("But yet I praye to al this compaignye").
On the other hand, the Wife of Bath seems to live a personal life that is well matched with the sentence of her tale.
Had Freud bothered to consult Chaucer's Wife of Bath, he wouldn't have been so stupefied.
But while wandering around the museum dedicated to the famous stories I really bonded with The Miller and The Wife of Bath.