wild flower

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wild flower

1. any flowering plant that grows in an uncultivated state
2. the flower of such a plant
References in classic literature ?
We went on climbing, higher and higher, and curving hither and thither, in the shade of noble woods, and with a rich variety and profusion of wild flowers all about us; and glimpses of rounded grassy backbones below us occupied by trim chalets and nibbling sheep, and other glimpses of far lower altitudes, where distance diminished the chalets to toys and obliterated the sheep altogether; and every now and then some ermined monarch of the Alps swung magnificently into view for a moment, then drifted past an intervening spur and disappeared again.
Ezra Jennings stopped for a moment, and picked some wild flowers from the hedge by the roadside.
He tossed his little nosegay of wild flowers away from him, as if the remembrances which it recalled were remembrances which hurt him now.
Splendid trees reared their stately tops where splendid cathedrals once had reared their domes, and sweet wild flowers blossomed in simple serenity in soil that once was drenched with human blood.
You can grow wild flowers from seed and use them to create pictorial meadows, cottage borders and prairie grasslands - or grow them in pots.
Long disregarded as insignificant, roadside verges are helping some of the rarest wild flowers in the UK survive, according to a new study by conservation charity Plantlife.
However, images of a farmer's field covered in a blanket of multicoloured wild flowers are more likely to be seen on a greeting card than on a country drive in July.
Juliet Davenport OBE, CEO and founder of Good Energy said: Reducing carbon emissions is a vital part of conserving some of our most precious wild flowers, fungi, plants and their habitats here in the UK.
HUNDREDS of wild flowers will be springing up across Calderdale thanks to a project to inspire people to transform their communities by sowing seeds.
This is an excellent chance to transform local spaces by sowing, growing and sharing native, pollinator-friendly wild flowers and plants.
Since the Second World War, the number of sites where wild flowers thrive has diminished exponentially, their habitats have shrunk and in many cases, disappeared.