van de Velde

(redirected from Willem van de Velde)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

van de Velde:

see Velde, van deVelde, van de
, 17th-century Dutch family of artists. Jan van de Velde, 1593–1641, was a draftsman and engraver as well as a painter. His cousin Esaias van de Velde, c.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Velde, van de

(vän də vĕl`də), 17th-century Dutch family of artists. Jan van de Velde, 1593–1641, was a draftsman and engraver as well as a painter. His cousin Esaias van de Velde, c.1591–1630, a painter of genre and battle scenes, is best known for his clearly delineated landscapes. His Ferry Boat (Rijksmus.) is indicative of the trend Dutch landscape was soon to follow. Esaias's pupil Jan van Goyen was greatly influenced by his work. His brother Willem van de Velde, the elder, 1611–93, a marine painter, accompanied the Dutch fleet and depicted its victories over the English. He settled in England in 1672 and executed many works preserved at Hampton Court; he is also well represented in Amsterdam. He is thought to have worked often in collaboration with his son Willem van de Velde, the younger, 1633–1707, who was the most renowned marine painter of his day and is considered the father of English marine painting. Willem, the younger, was with his father in the fleet and in England and was commissioned by Charles II to portray naval engagements, being court painter from 1677. The National Maritime Museum in London has an important collection of his paintings. His brother, Adriaen van de Velde, 1636–72, was a landscape painter who showed a keen perception of the changes in light due to the season and the hour of the day. Most of his landscapes contain figures, and he often painted the figures in the landscapes of other painters, including his brother Willem, the younger, Hobbema, Ruisdael, his master Wynants, and Jan van der Heyden. Jan Jansz van de Velde, 1620–63, the son of Jan van de Velde, painted still lifes with fine, coloristic subtlety. His Still-life Study is in the National Gallery, London.

Velde, Van de

 

A family of 17th-century Dutch painters. The best-known are Esaias, Willem, and Adriaen van de Velde.

Esaias van de Velde. Born circa 1590-91 in Amsterdam; buried Nov. 18, 1630, in The Hague. From 1610 he worked in Haarlem and from 1618 onward in The Hague. He was one of the founders of the Dutch School of landscape painting (Landscape With Riders, 1623, Hermitage, Leningrad; Dune Landscape, 1629, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam). With time he acquired a simplicity and naturalness of style in his depiction of forms, an integral emotional feeling for the life of nature linked to the lives of simple folk, and a unity of tone enriched by contrasts of light and shade. The sharpness of his observation of life can also be seen in his genre paintings (Company on the Terrace, 1622, Hermitage) and battle scenes (The Attack on the Van, 1626, Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow).

Willem van de Velde. Baptized Dec. 18, 1633, in Leiden; died Apr. 6, 1707, in London. He worked in Amsterdam and from 1673 onward in London. He painted seascapes in bright colors, depicting calm or slightly rough seas with large silhouettes of ships and lofty skies with swirling clouds. His paintings convey an impression of triumph and heroism (Shipping in a Calm, 1657, National Gallery, London; Salute of Guns, Staatliche Museen, Berlin-Dahlem).

Adriaen van de Velde. Baptized Nov. 30, 1636, in Amsterdam; buried Jan. 21, 1672, in Amsterdam. He was a brother of Willem. His work covers practically all genres of Dutch painting and drawing (portrait, religious, mythological, and allegorical), but he also acquired fame as a painter of landscapes with human and animal figures (The Beach at Scheveningen, 1658, Art Gallery, Kassel; The Farm, 1666, Staatliche Museen, Berlin-Dahlem). The attraction of his landscapes lies in his bright festive attitude to nature and the transparent freshness and purity of his delicate shades of color. At the same time his democratic traditions gradually gave way to contemplation, elegant refinement, and idyllic forms and finally to an attachment to Italian motifs and pastoral scenes.

REFERENCE

Zoege von Manteuffel, K. Die Künstlerfamilie van de Velde. Bielefeld-Leipzig, 1927.
References in periodicals archive ?
A dramatic composition by Willem Van de Velde -- an early war artist who 350 years ago went to great lengths to capture the heat of the action -- the painting left far behind its pre-sale estimate of 1.
The seascapes by Jan Porcellis and Willem van de Velde the Younger contrast the still waters of the canals with the turbulence of the North Sea.