William Herschel Telescope


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William Herschel Telescope

(her -shĕl) A 4.2-meter reflecting telescope with an altazimuth mounting sited at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory in the Canaries and forming part of the Isaac Newton Group. It is largely a UK telescope with the Dutch and Spanish sharing observing time. It began regular operations in 1987. It has a glass-ceramic (Cer-Vit) primary mirror of great thermal stability and a focal ratio of f/2.4. The telescope can be used in a Cassegrain configuration (there is also an off-axis ‘broken Cassegrain’ focus). In addition, light from the secondary mirror can be diverted through the altitude bearings of the Y-shaped fork mounting to two Nasmyth foci, where heavy instruments can be mounted. Sophisticated electronic equipment detects and analyzes the light. In 2000, the William Herschel Infrared Camera (WHIRCAM) was replaced by the Isaac Newton Group Red Imaging Device (INGRID), a near-infrared camera for use mainly at the telescope's Cassegrain focus. INGRID is optimized for a wide field of view at relatively short wavelengths (0.8–2.5 μm). Its 1024 × 1024 near-infrared detector array provides imaging at a resolution of 0.25 arcseconds per pixel.
References in periodicals archive ?
This dwarf star was selected from SDSS/BOSS as a metal-poor candidate and follow-up spectroscopic observations at medium-resolution were obtained with ISIS at William Herschel Telescope and OSIRIS at Gran Telescopio de Canarias," the researchers wrote in the paper.
According to Professor Keith Mason, chief executive of the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) which funds the William Herschel Telescope, "This new transmission spectrum is good news for future upcoming ground and space-based missions dedicated to the search for life in the universe.
Andrews in Scotland and his colleagues used the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands.
2-meter William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands.
The observation was made by UK astronomers, using the Science and Technology Facilities Council's (STFC) William Herschel Telescope on La Palma.
Armed with these images, as well a smaller set his team took with the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands, Spain, and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope atop Hawaii's Mauna Kea, Shanks' team found that the number of galaxies increases sharply as their brightness decreases.
Using spectroscopy from the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands, Campbell and her colleagues found that Gaia14aae contains large amounts of helium, but no hydrogen, which is highly unusual as hydrogen is the most common element in the Universe.
In contrast, the ESA astronomers used a real, albeit small, imaging array of 6 by 6 pixels, each 25 microns square, on the 4-meter William Herschel Telescope at La Palma in the Canary Islands.
Steidel and his collaborators gathered such multiwavelength portraits at three observatories: the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands, Spain, the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in La Serena, Chile, and Palomar Observatory near Escondido, Calif.
2-meter William Herschel Telescope on the island of La Palma, M51, the Whirlpool Galaxy, appears to float among the stars of northeastern Canes Venatici.
30, a month after the comet's discovery, Alan Fitzsimmons and Martin Cartwright of Queen's University in Belfast, Northern Ireland, obtained spectra of Hale-Bopp with the 4-meter William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands, Spain.
They also imaged the galaxy in visible light with the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands, Spain.