Shawn, William

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Shawn, William

(1907–92) editor; born in Chicago. As the New Yorker 's managing editor (1939–52), and as its skilled if autocratic editor in chief (1952–87), he exercised a strong influence on the magazine's development.
References in periodicals archive ?
Groomsmen were Bradley Allen Futch of Midland, Texas; John Phillip Garrett, William Scott Gibson, Christopher James Moffett, William Shawn Stewart, Daniel Bailey Whitehead, and Walter Gavin Whitehead all of Meridian; Charles Alexander Hensleigh of Alexander City, Alabama; and William Charles Ledbetter of Birmingham, Alabama.
Nicholas Woodeson's William Shawn, editor of The New Yorker, may regret the discomfort the decision brought but shows quiet courage.
The film focuses on the 1961 trial of a former Nazi, Adolf Eichmann, which Arendt covered for the distinguished magazine The New Yorker under the aegis of editor William Shawn (Nicholas Woodeson).
When the Mossad, the Israeli intelligence agency, captures the Nazi officer Adolf Eichmann and takes him clandestinely to Jerusalem to stand trial, Arendt, who has a strong philosophical interest in totalitarianism, discusses with her husband, Heinrich (Axel Milberg), about asking William Shawn (Nicholas Woodeson), the editor of The New Yorker, to send her to cover the impending trial for the magazine.
The play has four main protagonists: Brennan (Catherine Walker), William Shawn (Lorcan Cranitch), who is really a composite of William Maxwell and William Shawn, St.
William Shawn Sandusky: Plaintiff alleges breach of contract.
His father was, of course, William Shawn, the legendary New Yorker editor, and Shawn himself has been for decades a spirited playwright and free-thinker--see, for instance, his controversial 1985 play Aunt Dan and Lemon, wherein the two title characters enthusiastically expound on the merits of fascism (both Hitler's and Kissinger's).
In 1998, Mehta wrote Remembering Mr Shawn's New Yorker , which tells the story of his relationship with his mentor, William Shawn, one- time editor of The New Yorker , and the story of the literary institution under him, till Shawn was dismissed in 1987, signaling the end of an era.
The scion of legendary New Yorker editor William Shawn, he makes no bones about his enviable birthright.
For more than three decades after that, The New Yorker unquestionably was a reflection of William Shawn and his bristling social conscience.
Shawn was born in New York City in 1943 and grew up on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, the son of journalist Cecille Lyon Shawn and William Shawn, the longtime editor of The New Yorker.
Yagoda (author of a splendid biography of Will Rogers) does a superb and thorough job of telling the New Yorker's life story from its inception and first golden age under the gruffly inspired Harold Ross, through the more complex era of Ross' successor William Shawn.