William of Malmesbury


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

William of Malmesbury

(mämz`bərē), c.1096–1143, English writer, monk of Malmesbury. His most important work is the Gesta regum Anglorum, a history of the kings of England from 449 to 1127, with its continuation, Historia novella (ed. by William Stubbs, 1887–89). Book V is contemporary history, especially valuable for the reigns of Henry I and Stephen. The work appeared in English as The Chronicle of the Kings of England (see ed. by J. A. Giles, 1847, repr. 1968). He also wrote Gesta pontificum Anglorum, a source for early ecclesiastical history and for several saints' lives.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
This account from the Chronicle is also elaborated by William of Malmesbury, who adds that AElfheah was decapitated and later found incorrupt.
Even modern critical editions of Geoffrey of Monmouth and William of Malmesbury use these textual divisions, assigning numbers to the sections.
In fact, Foot describes in her appendix how William of Malmesbury may have done just that.
Under most headings, the expected texts are discussed, for example, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under chronicle, but also one finds William of Malmesbury and Henry of Hutingdon.
2) The chronicles of William of Malmesbury,(3) and the anonymous Gesta Stephani Regis,(4) reveal anxiety over the prospect of Matilda as a powerful queen by elaborating and maximizing the roles of male relations and rivals, thus reducing the representation of Matilda as a powerful figure.
Indeed, mediaeval chronicler William of Malmesbury reckoned that Harold lost the Battle of Hastings in 1066 because his men were too drunk to fight properly.
at Bruna's geweorc ('fortification')') in Simeon, Brunandune in AEthelweard's chronicle, Brunefort (probably ford) in the Liber de Hyda, and Brunefeld in William of Malmesbury, at least some of which are presumably expressions, or even names, denoting actual localities (a farm, a down, a ford, etc.
At his court, wrote William of Malmesbury, "the model for young men was to rival women in delicacy of person, to mince their gait, to walk with loose gesture and half naked.
The entry for William of Malmesbury surely deserved subdivision more than those for (say) Paris or Surrey; he is even denied a cross-reference under |Dunstan, St, biographers'.
In the 12th century, the fame of Arthur spread to England, where it was noted by William of Malmesbury in his Gesta Regum Anglorum ( Chronicle of the Kings of England, c1120 - 28).
Ordericus Vitalis, and his near contemporary William of Malmesbury, whose name will inevitably come up from time to time in this article, had a more optimistic view of history than their great forebears, Augustine and Orosius, (1) and saw some value in trying to tease out the thread of where history was properly going in the short term, this side of the Apocalypse.
For someone like Tatfrith (bishop of Whitby) little could be said; for others like William of Malmesbury, for example, more information was available (padded out by a digression, which Leland later deleted, castigating his bite noire, Polydore Vergil, for omitting William from his Historia Anglica).