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Wilson,

city (1990 pop. 36,930), seat of Wilson co., E N.C., in a rich agricultural region; inc. 1849. It is a commercial and industrial center with a large tobacco market. There is tobacco and food processing and the manufacture of metal, paper, plastic, glass, fiberglass, and electrical products; chemicals; and apparel. Barton College is there.

Wilson

1. Alexander. 1766--1813, Scottish ornithologist in the US
2. Sir Angus (Frank Johnstone). 1913--91, British writer, whose works include the collection of short stories The Wrong Set (1949) and the novels Anglo-Saxon Attitudes (1956) and No Laughing Matter (1967)
3. Charles Thomson Rees. 1869--1959, Scottish physicist, who invented the cloud chamber: shared the Nobel prize for physics 1927
4. Edmund. 1895--1972, US critic, noted esp for Axel's Castle (1931), a study of the symbolist movement
5. (James) Harold, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx. 1916--95, British Labour statesman; prime minister (1964--70; 1974--76)
6. Jacqueline. born 1945, British writer for older girls; her best-selling books include The Story of Tracey Beaker (1991), The Illustrated Mum (1998), and Girls in Tears (2002).
7. Richard. 1714--82, Welsh landscape painter
8. (Thomas) Woodrow . 1856--1924, US Democratic statesman; 28th president of the US (1913--21). He led the US into World War I in 1917 and proposed the Fourteen Points (1918) as a basis for peace. Although he secured the formation of the League of Nations, the US Senate refused to support it: Nobel peace prize 1919
References in periodicals archive ?
para]]"Although Wilson's Disease has been recognized for more than one hundred years, many patients have a delayed diagnosis or a misdiagnosis causing disease progression, potentially irreversible organ damage, and even death.
Having worked on earlier proposals, Wilson and Long & Kentish were clearly the most suited architects for the job, not only building on Wilson's extensive experience, but also on Long & Kentish's unique expertise in designing naturally lit spaces, having worked for many years configuring studios for some of the world's most well known artists.
An English woman who lived in Jamaica during a time of war and slave rebellion, she was in Wilson's words at once a "courtesan turned colonial official, [and] the trickster black widow, who demonstrates the performativity of nation, gender, race, and class, turning the establishment on its head" (p.
Wilson's nine-year battle with the Murdoch-owned WTVT/Channel 13 in Tampa, Florida, made him a cause celebre in media activist circles.
Though Wilson's fame in America is considerable in certain circles, his work has been more warmly embraced in Europe.
A lot of us blacks who work in the theater had heard of Wilson's talent long before the American theater at large was introduced to him.
In order to characterize Wilson's way of remaking American history by recovering African American narratives, Elam, in the beginning chapter, coins the word "(w)righting.
A prolific and popular author, Wilson's works include Insect Societies (I 971 ), Sociobiology: The New Synthesis (1975), On Human Nature (1978), Biophilia (1984), The Ants (with Bert Holldobler, 1990), The Diversity of Life (1992), The Naturalist (1994), In Search of Nature (1996), Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge (1998), and The Future of Life (2002).
Already in the early '90s, certain critics were balking at Fred Wilson's museum interventions and his peculiar brand of materialist historicism, levying charges that the artist's finger-pointing politics were not only too overt but, worse still, passe.
Wisconsin Senator Robert LaFollette, a "progressive" socialist who heroically opposed both the war and Wilson's barbarous post-war diplomacy, described how senators would rise in support of Wilson's proposal, "each straining to outdo the others to make sure not a cent should go to feed a German.
Wilson's speech abandoned the nation's isolationist traditions and charted a new course for internationalism, envisioning the United States as the indispensable nation that could guarantee peace and prosperity abroad.
But Wilson's idealism would have to overcome his allies' intense desires to make Germany pay clearly for its aggression--and the wish of many Americans to withdraw from foreign obligations after the country's wartime sacrifices.