Windows 8 UI

Windows 8 UI

(Windows 8 User Interface) The user interface in Windows 8, which replaced the Start menu with a Start screen, Apps screen and Charm bar. It supported full-screen applications suited for tablets, originally known as the Metro style. See Windows 8 and Win8 abc's.
References in periodicals archive ?
Android, iOS, Windows Desktop and Windows 8 UI are currently supported.
The app is currently available on Android, iOS, Windows Desktop and Windows 8 UI.
The new Dropbox app adheres to the style of Microsoft's Windows 8 UI and lets you scroll horizontally to view your files and folders.
If you have a Windows 8 laptop or desktop PC, or even an x86/x64-based tablet with a keyboard dock, you will probably find Dropbox's desktop functionality to be more useful and may not need the Windows 8 UI version.
The Windows 8 UI is uncomplicated; the tiles are big and easy to hit with a finger making it very convenient for a touch screen.
This was formerly labeled as the Windows 8 "Metro" interface, but the name was recently scrapped and the new layout is simply referred to as the "new Windows 8 UI.
Delphi XE3 and C++Builder XE3, both included in RAD Studio XE3, enable developers to build native PC and Slate/Surface Pro tablet applications with the Windows 8 UI style widely known as "Metro" as well as Retina-ready native OS X Mountain Lion applications for Apple's Mac hardware line.
The new "Metropolis UI"toolset enables developers to easily build new applications or migrate existing applications to the Windows 8 UI style with integrated support for touch, Live Tiles, and tablet device sensors.
With its new application development tools, RAD Studio XE3 enables developers to update existing Windows desktop apps to Windows 8 and the new Windows 8 UI style for both desktop and Slate tablet devices with integrated touch and device sensor support.
With the Embarcadero tools, developers are on the fast track to bringing Windows 8 UI style applications to new and existing Windows desktops and Slate devices, as well as the announced Intel powered Surface Pro.
However, this doesn't seem too plausible, since the company has been promoting its Metro branding since Windows Phone 7 launched in 2010, and has yet to select a new title for the Windows 8 UI.