Windsor


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Windsor

(wĭn`zər), family name of the royal house of Great Britain. The name Wettin, family name of Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, consort of Queen Victoria, was changed to Windsor by George V in 1917. The new name was adopted by all members of the family. In 1952, Queen Elizabeth II, who married Philip Mountbatten, duke of Edinburgh, decreed that she and her descendants (other than females who marry) should retain the name Windsor. A declaration of 1960, however, restricted the name to those descendants bearing the title prince or princess (i.e., the sovereign's children, the children of the sovereign's sons, and the eldest son of the eldest son of the prince of Wales); all other descendants are to be known as Mountbatten-Windsor.

Windsor

(wĭn`zər). 1 Town (1991 pop. 3,625), central N.S., Canada, at the mouth of the Avon River on an arm of Minas Basin. It is the center of a gypsum and limestone-quarrying area. Manufactures include fertilizers, building materials, and lumber products. Windsor was settled by Acadians (1703) and called Pisiquid. After their expulsion it was settled by New Englanders and renamed in 1764. It is the site of Fort Edward, built (1750) by the British. King's College, the first English university in Canada, was founded in Windsor in 1789 but moved in 1923 to Halifax as part of Dalhousie Univ. Windsor claims to be the cradle of Canadian hockey, on the basis of evidence in T. C. HaliburtonHaliburton, Thomas Chandler
, pseud. Sam Slick,
1796–1865, Canadian jurist and author. Haliburton was a judge of the court of common pleas in 1829 and a judge of the provincial supreme court in 1841; he retired in 1856.
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's The Attaché. 2 City (1991 pop. 191,435), S Ont., Canada, on the Detroit River opposite Detroit, Mich. It is Canada's leading port of entry from the United States and is in a rich agricultural region. Its manufactures include automobiles, industrial machinery, food and beverages, salt, and chemicals. The city was settled by the French in 1749. After the American Revolution many Loyalists settled in the area. In the early 20th cent., when Ford, General Motors, Chrysler, and other automobile companies built plants in the area, Windsor was known as the "Auto Capital of the British Empire." By the early 21st cent., however, Windsor had suffered from the downsizing that affected the American automotive industry, and most of the plants there had closed. The former suburb of Sandwich was merged with Windsor in 1935. The city is the seat of Windsor Univ.

Windsor

(wĭn`zər), town (1991 pop. 31,544), Windsor and Maidenhead, S central England, on the Thames River. There is some light industry and printing. The town is a popular tourist destination; the Danish toymaker Lego opened a Legoland amusement park there in 1996. In Elizabethan times about 70 inns enlivened Windsor. Christopher WrenWren, Sir Christopher,
1632–1723, English architect. A mathematical prodigy, he studied at Oxford. He was professor of astronomy at Gresham College, London, from 1657 to 1661, when he became Savilian professor of astronomy at Oxford.
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 designed the town hall, and Grinling GibbonsGibbons, Grinling,
1648–1721, English wood carver and sculptor, b. Rotterdam. From the reign of Charles II to that of George I he was master wood carver to the crown. Sir Christopher Wren employed him for architectural decoration.
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 did much of the wood carving in the Church of St. John the Baptist.

The town's importance derives from Windsor Castle, the chief residence of English rulers since William IWilliam I
or William the Conqueror,
1027?–1087, king of England (1066–87). Earnest and resourceful, William was not only one of the greatest of English monarchs but a pivotal figure in European history as well.
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. The castle was improved and rebuilt by successive sovereigns. Henry IIHenry II,
1133–89, king of England (1154–89), son of Matilda, queen of England, and Geoffrey IV, count of Anjou. He was the founder of the Angevin, or Plantagenet, line in England and one of the ablest and most remarkable of the English kings.
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 erected the Round Tower, and Edward IVEdward IV,
1442–83, king of England (1461–70, 1471–83), son of Richard, duke of York. He succeeded to the leadership of the Yorkist party (see Roses, Wars of the) after the death of his father in Wakefield in 1460.
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 began the construction of St. George's Chapel, one of the most splendid churches in England, where the Knights of the Garter are installed with medieval ceremony. In the chapel are buried several of England's kings. Some vaults are used to store art treasures, national archives, and museum collections.

The modern castle, which contains about 1,000 rooms and occupies 13 acres (5 hectares), consists of three "wards"—the upper, middle, and lower. In 1992 a fire in the upper ward destroyed or damaged more than 100 rooms; restoration was completed in 1997. The castle proper lies in the Home Park, and beyond it, separated by the tree-lined Long Walk, is the Great Park. In Frogmore, the royal mausoleum, Queen VictoriaVictoria
(Alexandrina Victoria) , 1819–1901, queen of Great Britain and Ireland (1837–1901) and empress of India (1876–1901). She was the daughter of Edward, duke of Kent (fourth son of George III), and Princess Mary Louise Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld.
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 and Prince AlbertAlbert,
1819–61, prince consort of Victoria of Great Britain, whom he married in 1840. He was of Wettin lineage, the son of Ernest I, duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, and first cousin to Victoria.
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 are buried. On the castle grounds is a large lake named Virginia Water.


Windsor

(wĭn`zər), town (1990 pop. 27,817), Hartford co., N Conn., at the confluence of the Farmington and Connecticut rivers, just N of Hartford. Settled by Plymouth ColonyPlymouth Colony,
settlement made by the Pilgrims on the coast of Massachusetts in 1620. Founding

Previous attempts at colonization in America (1606, 1607–8) by the Plymouth Company, chartered in 1606 along with the London Company (see Virginia Company), were
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 in 1633, the town was named Dorchester in 1635 and renamed Windsor in 1637. Windsor was the first English settlement in Connecticut and is the state's oldest town. Although primarily residential, the town has a variety of industries including insurance and the manufacture of iron and paper products, computer components, tools, machinery, and electronics. It was once renowned for its tobacco production and still produces some shade-grown tobacco; the town was long a brick-manufacturing center. The American statesman Oliver EllsworthEllsworth, Oliver,
1745–1807, American political leader, 3d chief justice of the United States (1796–1800), b. Windsor, Conn. A Hartford lawyer, he was (1778–83) a member of the Continental Congress during the American Revolution. His great service was at the U.
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 was born there; his home is a museum. Colonial buildings in Windsor include Fyler House (1640) and the Joseph Loomis House.

Windsor

 

(New Windsor), a city in Great Britain, in Berkshire County, on the Thames River, 37 km west of London. Population, 17,200 (1967).

Windsor is the main summer residence of the British kings. The royal castle was built at the end of the 11th century by William the Conqueror. The present-day ensemble with its two courts, “round tower” in the center (c. 1272), and very old park (its main sections date from the 17th and 18th centuries), is the result of additions and renovations from the 13th through the 19th centuries. Saint George’s Chapel (1474—1528), with its fan vaults, is a masterpiece of English late Gothic architecture. The castle has a very rich collection of paintings, drawings, Gobelin tapestries, and weaponry.

REFERENCE

Bailie, A. V. Windsor Castle and The Chapel of Saint George. London-Toronto, 1927.

Windsor

 

a city in eastern Canada, in the province of Ontario. Situated on the Detroit River, across from the city of Detroit in the United States; linked with Detroit by a bridge and tunnel. Population, 258,600 (1971). A transportation junction, Windsor is Canada’s leading producer of automobiles. Other industries include the production of electronic and other equipment for automobiles, ferrous metallurgy, and the production of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Windsor has two universities.

Windsor

1
1. the official name of the British royal family from 1917
2. Duke of. the title of Edward VIII from 1937

Windsor

2
1. a town in S England, in Windsor and Maidenhead unitary authority, Berkshire, on the River Thames, linked by bridge with Eton: site of Windsor Castle, residence of English monarchs since its founding by William the Conqueror; Old Windsor, royal residence in the time of Edward the Confessor, is 3 km (2 miles) southeast. Pop.: 26 747 (2001 est.)
2. a city in SE Canada, in S Ontario on the Detroit River opposite Detroit: motor-vehicle manufacturing; university (1963). Pop.: 208 402 (2001)
References in periodicals archive ?
Another attraction is Windsor and Royal Borough Museum in Windsor Guildhall, where Charles and Camilla married and Elton John and David Furnish had their civil ceremony.
ASICS's ill intent is evidenced by its complete refusal to honor its many promises to Windsor and plaintiffs-promises that were critical to Windsor's success," the lawsuit states.
Beverley Molmans has been appointed the first manager of Macdonald Windsor Hotel and, with more than 12 years' experience of working at Macdonald Hotels, Beverley is eagerly anticipating the grand opening and welcoming guests from across the globe.
Free admittance to five of the Windsor Chamber's "After Business" events annually.
Lenny and Windsor were in a hotel and, uh, never mind.
They kept on saying that we should be playing softball, where all the girls were, that this was a boys' sport,'' Sarah Windsor said.
Windsor Door has filed a counter suit, saying Royal owes it $420,000 in outstanding bills.
Under its old burden-rate structure, Windsor looked at how direct labor drove costs for entire departments and for common production tasks.
Windsor Place of Wilmington Provides Caring and Elegant Community for Seniors
Rooms at the Macdonald Windsor Hotel cost from around PS150 B&B for two sharing at the weekend.
19, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Windsor Advantage, LLC, a leading lender service provider to banks and credit unions participating inSmall Business Administration (SBA) loan programs, has successfully completed the comprehensive SAS-70/SSAE-16 Type II audit.