Winged bull

Winged bull

A winged human-headed bull of colossal size, usually in pairs, guarding the portals of ancient Assyrian palaces as a symbol of force and domination.

winged bull

An Assyrian symbol of force and domination, of frequent occurrence in ancient Assyrian architectural sculpture; pairs of winged human-headed bulls and lions of colossal size usually guarded the portals of palaces.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said since a few pieces like the Winged Bull aws too heavy and could not be transferred they broke it down in front of the cameras.
The clips from the Daesh video show militants taking sledgehammers and drills to smash ancient Mesopotamian statues, toppling them from plinths, smashing them with a sledgehammer and breaking up a carving of a winged bull, that dated to the 7th century BC, with a drill.
Militants are also seen using a jackhammer to deface a colossal 40-tonne Assyrian winged bull in an archaeological park in Mosul.
The footage showed the terrorists shoving statues off their plinths, shattering them on the floor and applying an electric drill to a large winged bull.
They are also shown using a jackhammer to deface a large Assyrian winged bull at a huge archeological site in Mosul.
One enormous sculpture, cast in bronze into which Shoaib has mixed traces of gold to give the metal a warm hue and elusive sheen, depicts a winged bull, circled upon itself in an agonized fetal ball, tail raised above in an elegant curve, its tip a whirling mass of fine strands that come to a perfect point.
In the 90s, the research centre thus created an exceptionally resistant material similar to gypseous alabaster in order to create a reproduction of an Assyrian winged bull from Khorsabad housed in Chicago, which is currently on show in the Louvre.
A winged bull is carved on the front of the column and it is flanked by a sphinx on its left.
Atop each screen sits a "lamassu," a winged bull, that some believed to be a spiritual being with the head of a human, the body and ears of a bull, and the wings of an angel or bird.
The video, released on Thursday, showed men smashing up artefacts dating back to the 7th century BC Assyrian era, toppling statues from plinths, smashing them with a sledgehammer and breaking up a carving of a winged bull with a drill.
The exhibition also includes a set of bookends in the shapes of the famous winged bull and winged lion, made by Copeland after 1868 in 'Parian ware' (a glistening white porcelain that looked like marble) and a set of jugs by Ridgway & Abington, brightly coloured in green, pink and yellow, decorated with the same winged bulls and lions, with serpent handles.
The video, released on Thursday, showed ISIL terrorists smashing up artifacts dating back to the Assyrian era (7th century BC), toppling statues from plinths, smashing them with a sledgehammer and breaking up a carving of a winged bull with a drill.