wireframe

(redirected from Wire frame)
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wireframe

[‚wīr′frām]
(computer science)
In computer-aided design, a line-drawn model.
In computer graphics, an image-rendering technique in which only edges and vertices are shown.

wireframe

An umbrella term for a general outline of some structure. For example, the rough design of Web pages may be called wireframes. See wireframe modeling.
References in periodicals archive ?
Use a pair of needle nose pliers to help you secure small decorations to the wire frame.
It's a wire frame that can hold any size tablet up to one inch thick, and that pretty much covers all models.
MATERIALS Douglas fir, cedar, and forsythia branches, felt, balsa-wood sheets and dowels, silk-screening materials, hot glue, wire, wire frame.
The wire frame is a rudimentary version of the site, without a lot of the snazzy technology we've grown accustomed to seeing.
This style of floor support is easier and more economical to manufacture than welded wire frame supports, while still providing excellent support and allowing ample air movement and even heat distribution in the plenum area.
And it's all wrapped up in wonderful old school wire frame graphics.
The dining chair and the low, inviting lounge chair are both built up over a classic wire frame, and its bent legs lend it lightness and elegance.
This wire frame also makes it possible for the probe to reach parts of the joint surface that probes with rigid designs cannot access.
First Light, a year-old company, unveils wrought-iron lamps with florallike shades made from a treated silk material over a wire frame, available in seven colors.
This material handling cart from Meese Orbitron Dunne Company features a wire frame that allows it to be knocked down for space-saving storage or low profile transport in a single carton that meets UPS ground shipping specifications.
Artist Richard Morrison lucked out when his mask--a wire frame moulding of his face, covered in bacon and dunked in formaldehyde--was mistakenly identified as a human head suspended in a jar by a burglar attempting robbery.
This ingenious four-sided mesh bag stretched over a wire frame folds flat when not in use, making for easy storage.