WEP

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Related to Wired Equivalent Privacy: WPA

WEP

(Wired Equivalent Privacy) An IEEE standard security protocol for wireless 802.11 networks. Introduced in 1997, WEP was found to be very inadequate and was superseded by WPA, WPA2 and 802.11i. Its authentication method was extremely weak and even helped an attacker decipher the secret encryption key. As a result, WEP authentication was dropped from the Wi-Fi specification.

Passwords Are Required
WEP uses passwords that are entered manually at both ends (see preshared keys). Using the RC4 encryption algorithm, WEP originally specified a 40-bit key, but was later boosted to 104 bits. Combined with a 24-bit initialization vector, WEP is often touted as having a 128-bit key. See WPA, 802.11i and initialization vector.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, a group of respected security researchers at the University of California-Berkeley discovered the vulnerabilities of the Wired Equivalent Privacy algorithm (WEP).
In a mixed environment, access points will typically use a lowest-common-denominator cipher as the group cipher, such as wired equivalent privacy or temporal key integrity protocol, to allow both 802.
11i will offer a new version of the Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) security protocol that uses a 128-bit key instead of the 40-bit key currently in use.
In addition, it supports an array of security features such as 64/128-bit Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), Cisco Compatible Extensions (CCX), Wi-Fi(TM) Protected Access (WPA), Temporal Key Integrity Protocol (TKIP), and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES-CCMP).
The SWL-2000 provides encryption security at up to 128 bits using Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) security.
Some solutions include access point security, wired equivalent privacy (WEP), network IDs, media access control (MAC) address identification, vendor specific authentication, and virtual private networks.
In fact, nearly sixty percent (60 %) of APs were using Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), the weakest protocol for wireless data encryption, which can be compromised in minutes but is in wide use today.
11 standard included a set of security features known as wired equivalent privacy (WEP) that had serious shortcomings right from the start.
Implementing Media Access Control (MAC) Authentication along with Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) gives the D-LinkAir DWL-900AP a more secure method for connecting several locations wirelessly, alleviating the fear of intrusion.
In April, AirDefense unveiled its WEP Cloaking[TM] module, the first and only technology for global retailers and other companies using the Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) security standard to protect wireless networks.
Enable 128-bit or greater wired equivalent privacy (WEP) encryption, where possible.