Wolf number


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Wolf number

See relative sunspot number.

Wolf Number

 

one of the numerical characteristics of solar activity; it is determined by the formula R = k(10g + f), where f is the number of spots on the solar disc and g is the number of groups uniting these spots. The coefficient k depends on many causes (conditions of visibility, the “personal equation” of the observer, the size of the telescope, and so forth). The Wolf numbers that have been published by the Zürich Observatory since 1849 have been accepted as the international system (k = 1). Despite their great inaccuracy, the Wolf numbers have the advantage over other characteristics of solar activity that their values have been determined for more than 200 years (since 1749). They are frequently used in comparing solar activity and many geophysical phenomena. R. Wolf introduced the Wolf numbers in the mid-19th century.

Wolf number

[′vȯlf ‚nəm·bər]
References in periodicals archive ?
Wolf number in- creased rapidly when prey spe- cies were more vulnerable.
Meanwhile, the states annual wolf numbers reveal an enduring healthy population, with approximately 377 wolves in 52 packs with 25 breeding pairs.
The BC government's 2014 report on wolf management even states that a correlation between reducing wolf numbers and caribou recovery could not be demonstrated.
Wolf numbers fluctuated in Sanetti in response to CDV infection; the interepizootic interval was 4 years (Figure 3).
wolf numbers divided by area occupied) is lowest in systems of low ungulate biomass (Fuller et al.
However, as increased logging and farming claimed more habitat, and unregulated hunting and trapping took more wolves (bounties were paid for wolves into the early 1800s), wolf numbers dropped until they were no longer found in the Northeast.
Others want wolf numbers controlled because of their potential effects on prey numbers and livestock production.
Although some biologists are reluctant to attribute elk reductions directly to wolves, there is an exceedingly strong correlation between rising wolf numbers and fewer elk in many places.
In Alaska, effective recolonisation of the Kenai Peninsula was believed to be hampered by low wolf numbers on the mainland (Peterson & Woolington 1982).
But a conservation drive in the sierras of northwestern Spain and northern Portugal has seen a fourfold increase in wolf numbers, and a revival of age-old non-lethal methods to protect livestock has prompted a newfound respect among farmers for their former nemesis.
Wolf numbers in the Superior National Forest of Minnesota.