Wolf-Rayet star


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Wolf-Rayet star:

see spectral classspectral class,
in astronomy, a classification of the stars by their spectrum and luminosity. In 1885, E. C. Pickering began the first extensive attempt to classify the stars spectroscopically.
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Wolf-Rayet star

[¦vȯlf rī¦ā ‚stär]
(astronomy)
A member of a class of very hot stars (100,000-35,000 K) which characteristically show broad bright emission lines in their spectra; luminosities are high, probably in the range 104-105 times that of the sun; these stars are probably very young and represent an early short-lived stage in stellar evolution.
References in periodicals archive ?
For Wolf-Rayet stars which fuse helium or heavier elements in the core, fusion occurs in a domain at higher pressure than their counterparts.
In that process, the more compact star winds up gaining mass, and the original massive star loses its hydrogen envelope, exposing its helium core to become a Wolf-Rayet star.
Wolf-Rayet stars provided a possible answer because they released a lot of aluminum-26 but no iron-60.
Thick winds continually poured off the progenitors of such stars, flooding their surroundings and draining the outer layers of the Wolf-Rayet stars," NASA said.
Wolf-Rayet stars are the probable power sources for two other Hell nebulas examined in detail by Nazi's group.
It is losing mass rapidly through powerful stellar winds that have expelled the majority of its outermost hydrogen-rich layers, while its more mundane binary companion is probably about half as massive as the Wolf-Rayet star, and orbits around it once every 208 days.
Drissen's team speculated that the winds blown either by bright, hot stars known as Wolf-Rayet stars or by old stars called red supergiants could have pumped up the gas.
4-magnitude Wolf-Rayet star HD 56925 is just northwest of center.
Each huge, distant shell may be the remnant of an earlier supernova explosion that shattered the now-invisible binary companion of each Wolf-Rayet star, the reseachers said at an American Astronomical Society meeting this week in Kansas City, Mo.
In 1996 a Belgian team led by Gregor Rauw studied the very massive Wolf-Rayet star WR22 and measured a minimum mass of 72 Suns.
Large instruments reveal the object's bubble-like structure, which is due to fast stellar winds of a Wolf-Rayet star colliding with the surrounding interstellar medium of gas and dust pervading the region.
Before maximum light (which occurred on June 23) the star showed spectral patterns characteristic of a Wolf-Rayet star, particularly prominent signs of enrichment with nitrogen.