WordStar


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WordStar

An earlier full-featured word processing program for CP/M and DOS from MicroPro International Corporation, later renamed WordStar International. Introduced in 1978 for the CP/M operating system, WordStar was the first program to give full word processing capabilities to personal computer users at far less cost than the dedicated word processors of the time. Many WordStar keyboard commands became de facto standards for text manipulation (see WordStar diamond). WordStar was later acquired by The Learning Company. A Windows version was also created, and all were subsequently disbanded.


The WordStar Screen
This screen shot from a CP/M-based Kaypro computer shows how WordStar looked in its heyday. The 25 rows of 80 characters was the mainstay in the CP/M and DOS world until GUI-based applications superseded them. Note the menu at the top, which shows how to command the program using the Control key symbolized by the caret (^).
References in periodicals archive ?
One being that he enjoys the simplicity of WordStar 4.
Application software such as Wordstar, WordPerfect, Dbase, and Lotus 123 would allow users of these applications to create documents, databases and spreadsheets on the PC.
He has a huge collection of old UseNet files, original short fiction and research papers in AppleWorks, WordStar, WordPerfect (WP), Microsoft Word (four versions), Encapsulated PostScript (EPS), and WriteNow.
We tried to figure out whether there was any reason to save the WordStar software we found in the back of the supply closet.
The writing instruction was conducted in a computer classroom, where LD and non-LD students had access to their preferred computer types (Apple II, Macintosh 512, Zenith 159, and IBM PCs), and different word processing software, such as MacWrite for Macintosh, Applewriter, Appleworks, Fredwriter, Wordstar, Volkswriter, and PCWRITE, or products students brought for their own use.
The first fairly widely available personal computer (Altair 8800) appeared on the market in 1975, Apple Computer was founded in 1976, Wordstar appeared on the market in 1979, and finally, in 1981, the IBM PC made its appearance.
When we published our first rankings, Microsoft was a not-insignificant player that ranked #2 on our list after MicroPro International, the developer of WordStar (see page 4).
This is achieved with a variety of powerful standard editing features including dynamic tagging, source code browser, search and replace, cut & paste, syntax highlighting/coloring, dynamic spell checking, code folding, columnar editing, as well as complete keyboard emulation for Brief, vi, emacs, cua, edt, and wordstar.
WordStar was the dominant word-processing software in the early 1980s, but that didn't prevent WordPerfect from dominating the market by the early 1990s.
To bring in more money, Meiringer also transcribed scripts and other documents on the computer for writers, while Douma was tinkering with Wordstar, an early word processor, to ease the script-writing process.
Think back to what it was like to first learn WordStar or MacWrite (or whatever word processor you started on), and compare that with what it is like now, when you upgrade or learn a new one.
A few years ago it was WordStar and then WordPerfect that were the de facto standards.