Workman-Reynolds effect

Workman-Reynolds effect

[′wərk·mən ′ren·əlz i‚fekt]
(geophysics)
A mechanism for electric charge separation during freezing of slightly impure water; when a very dilute solution of certain salts freezes rapidly, a strong potential difference is established between the solid and liquid phases; for some salts, the ice attains negative charge, for others, positive; this mechanism has been suggested as one possible mode of thunderstorm charge separation in those portions of a thunderstorm downdraft where snow-pellet or hail particles sweep out supercooled waterdrops.