Yahwist


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Yahwist

, Jahwist, Yahvist, Jahvist
Bible the
a. the conjectured author or authors of the earliest of four main sources or strands of tradition of which the Pentateuch is composed and in which God is called Yahweh throughout
b. (as modifier): the Yahwist source
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References in periodicals archive ?
The billions who have professed faith in the God of Abraham over millennia of human history may then be fairly called Yahwists.
In this companion to his 2006 The Trial of Innocence: Adam, Eve, and the Yahwist Lacocque (emeritus Old Testament, Chicago Theological Seminary) extends his essay on the dialectic anthropology in Genesis 2:4-4:1 according to J, the so-called Yahwist literary source responsible for much of the narrative part in the chapters 2-11 of Genesis.
What about the much older Yahwist Genesis 2 story of the creation of humanity?
Paul Santmire contrasts the creation theology in the priestly and Yahwist stories with those in the book of Job.
If the creation of Adam and Lilith in Kogawa's book can be said to mirror Bal's argument eliminating the contradiction between the Priestly and Yahwist versions of creation, the poem and the article part ways in the descriptions of the original sin.
Historically, the people of Sodom and Gomorrah, whom the Yahwist condemned, were worshippers of vegetation deities, unwilling to recognize the visitation of the Lord; Dante's 'sodomites' were worshippers of themselves, preferring their own humanistic immortality and fame to eternal and heavenly life.
In fact, she proposes that the Yahwist account of Genesis 2, often interpreted as showing the inferiority of woman because of the woman's being created second, "moves to its climax, not its decline in the creation of woman.
585-535 BCE) was such a traumatic experience--the Temple destroyed, the Jewish leaders carried away to the east, the common folk dispersed from the center of Yahwist monotheism--that "Babylon" forever afterward stood in for any oppressive and dominating superpower.
Similar to a classroom situation, this review will focus on issues arising from my personal reading of Ziolkowski's edifying study, ranging from the Fall of Adam and Eve as described in the Yahwist source of the first chapter of Genesis, to the various literary and ideological uses of Prometheus in the German Democratic Republic, and the "Westernized" uses of the Faust theme in American literature.
Rilke's angel is dose to the duende--one wrests divinity from demonic hands-and here he writes in the spirit of the Yahwist, the name given to the earliest writer (or writers) of the Hebrew Bible.
The account of creation in chapter 1 of Genesis belongs to the Priestly tradition, whereas that in chapter 2 belongs to the Yahwist tradition.