Yahwist


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Yahwist

, Jahwist, Yahvist, Jahvist
Bible the
a. the conjectured author or authors of the earliest of four main sources or strands of tradition of which the Pentateuch is composed and in which God is called Yahweh throughout
b. (as modifier): the Yahwist source
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References in periodicals archive ?
The billions who have professed faith in the God of Abraham over millennia of human history may then be fairly called Yahwists.
In this companion to his 2006 The Trial of Innocence: Adam, Eve, and the Yahwist Lacocque (emeritus Old Testament, Chicago Theological Seminary) extends his essay on the dialectic anthropology in Genesis 2:4-4:1 according to J, the so-called Yahwist literary source responsible for much of the narrative part in the chapters 2-11 of Genesis.
What about the much older Yahwist Genesis 2 story of the creation of humanity?
Lemche, The Canaanites and Their Land (Sheffield, UK: Sheffield Academic, 1991) and The Israelites in History and Tradition (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 1998); John Van Seters, Prologue to History: The Yahwist as Historian in Genesis (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 1992) and The Life of Moses: The Yahwist as Historian in Exodus-Numbers (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 1994); William G.
Paul installed women as leaders in the churches he founded; 43-A; 44-C; 45-B, John's gospel has the washing of the feet story but no bread and wine; 46-B; 47-D; 48-C, the seamless garment is an image for a comprehensive respect for human life; 49-B; 50-C, the four sources are: Yahwist (J), Elohist, Deuteronomic, and Priestly, referring to characteristics of each source.
In his brilliantly kooky 2002 book Genius--subtitled "a mosaic of one hundred exemplary creative minds"--the esteemed Yale University literary scholar Harold Bloom included, among obvious entrants such as Shakespeare and Milton, two biblical authors: Saint Paul from the New Testament, and "the Yahwist," or J, who wrote key sections of the Old.
What Ilie first mentions asa general source of ideas, Judaism, will be seen to be the culture from which the specific Yahwist cult emerged.
Asen, "No, Yes and Perhaps in Amos and the Yahwist," Vetus Testamentum 43:4 (1993) pp.
440 BCE Priestly Codex and Genesis 2 to the older Yahwist strand.
Paul Santmire contrasts the creation theology in the priestly and Yahwist stories with those in the book of Job.
If the creation of Adam and Lilith in Kogawa's book can be said to mirror Bal's argument eliminating the contradiction between the Priestly and Yahwist versions of creation, the poem and the article part ways in the descriptions of the original sin.