Jeremiah

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Jeremiah
BirthplaceAnathoth
Occupation
Prophet

Jeremiah

(jĕrĭmī`ə), in the Bible. 1 Prophet of the book of JeremiahJeremiah
a book of the Bible, comprising a collection of prophetic oracles attributed to Jeremiah, a prophet who preached (c.628–586 B.C.) in Jerusalem under King Josiah and his successors. His message indicts his contemporaries for social injustice and religious apostasy.
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. 2 Father-in-law of Josiah. 3 Rechabite contemporary with Jeremiah the prophet. 4, 5, 6 Three who joined David at Ziklag.

Jeremiah

a book of the Bible, comprising a collection of prophetic oracles attributed to Jeremiah, a prophet who preached (c.628–586 B.C.) in Jerusalem under King Josiah and his successors. His message indicts his contemporaries for social injustice and religious apostasy. Jeremiah realistically opposed resistance to Babylon, and his insistence on speaking unpalatable truths brought him to prison and the stocks. When Jerusalem fell to Babylon (586 B.C.), Jeremiah was allowed to stay with the Jews who remained, who subsequently took him to Egypt. The oracles of the book were preserved by the prophet's secretary, BaruchBaruch
, in the Bible. 1 Jeremiah's scribe, for whom the book of Baruch is named. 2 Builder of the wall. 3 Signer of the Covenant.
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. They are not in strict chronological order, and there are important differences in the Hebrew and Greek texts. In the SeptuagintSeptuagint
[Lat.,=70], oldest extant Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible made by Hellenistic Jews, possibly from Alexandria, c.250 B.C. Legend, according to the fictional letter of Aristeas, records that it was done in 72 days by 72 translators for Ptolemy Philadelphus, which
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, chapter 25 is followed by chapters 46–51 of the Hebrew order with some rearrangement and omission of individual oracles. The New Revised Standard Version text follows the ordering of the material found in the Hebrew text. The Dead Sea Scrolls contain Hebrew fragments of Jeremiah that bear witness to both traditions. One analysis of the book would be as follows: introduction; oracles against Judah and Jerusalem denouncing social injustice, immorality, and breaking covenant with God with warnings of imminent destruction of the city—Jehoiakim's reign (609–598) is probably the setting for most of these oracles; oracles dating from the reign of Zedekiah; Babylon as God's agent in the coming destruction; Baruch's memoirs, including Jeremiah's letter to the first group of exiles; the prophecy of a new covenant replacing the one now irreparably broken; oracles against the nations; historical appendix. A series of laments, sometimes known as the confessions of Jeremiah, are interspersed throughout the book. These reveal something of the personal cost to the prophet of his ministry of confrontation. See also LamentationsLamentations,
book of the Bible, placed immediately after Jeremiah, to whose author it has been ascribed since ancient times. It was probably composed by several authors. It is a series of five poems mourning the destruction of Jerusalem by Babylon.
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.

Bibliography

See studies by R. P. Carroll (1986) and R. E. Clements (1988); see also bibliography under Old TestamentOld Testament,
Christian name for the Hebrew Bible, which serves as the first division of the Christian Bible (see New Testament). The designations "Old" and "New" seem to have been adopted after c.A.D.
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.

Jeremiah

 

Born circa 650 B.C. in Anathoth, the Kingdom of Judah; died after 586 B.C. in Egypt. The second of the so-called great prophets of Judaism. He began his work as a prophet as a youth in 626 B.C. A great number of Jeremiah’s sermons were devoted to the political situation of the Kingdom of Judah. Jeremiah preached of the necessity for peace with the most powerful of Judah’s enemies, Babylon; he preferred dependence on Babylon to the destruction of Judah. After the capture of Jerusalem by the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II in 586 B.C. , Jeremiah was allowed to remain in his homel and, but opponents of Babylonian rule forcibly took him to Egypt. Jeremiah’s sermons and sayings form the basis of the book of the Old Testament that bears his name. Some of them were written down by Jeremiah himself and some by his associate Baruch, who also included his own narratives about Jeremiah in the book. The final editing of the text was most probably carried out in the second century B.C. The Book of Jeremiah is an important source for the history of the Near East of the seventh and sixth centuries B.C.

It cannot be proved that Jeremiah wrote even one of the poems that make up the Old Testament book The Lamentations of Jeremiah. The traditional attribution of The Books of the Kings to Jeremiah is fallacious.

Jeremiah

the Lord’s herald. [O.T.: Jeremiah]

Jeremiah

Old Testament
a. a major prophet of Judah from about 626 to 587 bc
b. the book containing his oracles
References in periodicals archive ?
Santaniello, Nietzsche, God, and the Jews 104-5; Yirmiyahu Yovel, Dark Riddle: Hegel, Nietzsche, and the Jews (Cambridge, UK: Polity, 1998) 152-53.
Aaron Lichtenstein; The Seven Colors of the Rainbow: Torah Ethics for Non-Jews, by Rabbi Yirmiyahu Bindman; and Kol Boei Olam, edited by Rabbi Chaim Miller.
Miriam Paz, "Baruch Spinoza on Zionism: An Interview with Yirmiyahu Yovel," Midstream, Vol.
Krobb does not use the term 'Marrano' in its strict historical sense (Jewish converts to Christianity who, rightly or wrongly, were suspected of 'Judaizing' by the Inquisition) nor does he employ it as a metaphor for 'double consciousness' as an emblem of the modern condition (as in Elaine Marks's Marrano as Metaphor (New York: Columbia University Press, 1996) or in recent studies of Spinozaby Yirmiyahu Yovel (Spinoza and Other Heretics (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1989)) and Montaigne by Sophie Jama (L'Histoire juive de Montaigne (Paris: Flammarion, 2001)); here, 'Marrano' is shorthand for the entire Sephardic experience.
Yirmiyahu Yovel writes: "In abandoning the observant Judaism of his day, but refusing to convert to Christianity, Spinoza unwittingly embodied the alternatives that lay in wait for Jews of later generations following the encounter of Judaism with the modern world.
Desde un marco spinoziano de referencia, el horizonte del Ser es la inmanencia, como con acuidad ha sido advertido por Yirmiyahu Yovel en su polemico --contestado por Mechoulan y por Popkin (cf.
Biletzky, Essays on Yiddish Poetry and Prose Writers of the Twentieth Century, translated by Yirmiyahu Haggi (Tel Aviv: I.
1-36, and "Kant's Principle of Justice as a Categorical Imperative of Law", in Kant's Practical Philosophy Reconsidered, edited by Yirmiyahu Yovel, Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, 1989.
As described by Yirmiyahu Yovel, the Marrano experience of self-division has strong analogies to the represented experience of characters in Renaissance drama (though one must recognize of course that the way in which Yovel represents Marranos may itself be shaped by the literary tradition which I am trying to situate in a cultural context):
For Spinoza, the identification of Judaism with religion meant that he was "locked in a paradox, unable either to live positively as a Jew or to shed his basic Jewish identification," according to Hebrew University philosophy professor Yirmiyahu Yovel in his book Spinoza and Other Heretics.
The detailed analysis can help consumers choose the right credit card for gas purchases, and to use it right, so they get more out of these rewards programs," says Ziv Yirmiyahu.
It was like the Prophet Yirmiyahu [Jeremiah] and I were brothers.