Zakariadze, Sergei Aleksandrovich

Zakariadze, Sergei Aleksandrovich


Born June 18 (July 1), 1909, in Baku; died Apr. 13, 1971, in Tbilisi. Soviet Georgian actor. People’s Artist of the USSR (1958).

Zakariadze studied in the philology department of the University of Tbilisi. Having begun his stage career in 1926, he became an actor with the K. A. Mardzhanishvili Georgian Theater in Kutaisi (later in Tbilisi) in 1928. He joined the Sh. Rustaveli Georgian Theater in Tbilisi in 1956, becoming its artistic director in 1969.

Among the comic roles that Zakariadze created was Dzhibilo in Kakabadze’s The Kolkhoznik’s Wedding. He bitterly unmasked the characters he portrayed, such as Tinibeg in Mrevlishvili’s The Avalanche. He effectively created the romantic roles of Kadagi in Bakhtrioni (adapted from Vazha Pshavela) and the title role in Nakhutsrishvili’s Pirosmani. Some of Zakariadze’s portrayals were marked by subtle psychology, such as Oedipus in Sophocles’Oedipus Rex.

Zakariadze’s best performances were in the title roles of Gutzkow’s Uriel Acosta, Hugo’s Ruy Bias, and Shake-speare’s King Lear, as well as in the roles of Creon in Anouilh’s Antigone and the Little Giant in Nakhutsrishvili’s Chinchraka. A uniquely talented actor, he effectively created complex characters. By revealing the spiritual world of the hero, Zakariadze uncovered subtle psychological details. In the theater and motion pictures, he was particularly successful in the roles of individuals from the people, whom he portrayed with much humor and, at times, great dramatic spirit. Zakariadze first appeared in films in 1934. His film roles included Torgvai in The Last Crusaders (1934), Shadiman in Georgii Saakadze (1942–43), and Georgii Makharashvili in ,4 Soldier’s Father, (1965).

Zakariadze was a deputy to the seventh and eighth convocations of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR. He received the State Prize of the USSR (1946 and 1952) and the Lenin Prize (1966). He was awarded two orders and various medals.


Tvalchrelidze, T., and K. Tsereteli. “Sergo Zakariadze.” In the collection Aktery sovetskogo kino, issue 3. Moscow, 1967.