Zaleucus


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Zaleucus

(zəlo͞o`kəs), fl. c.650 B.C., Greek lawgiver of Locris, in Italy. According to tradition, his was the earliest codification of Greek law. References to Zaleucus' code, which was widely adopted in Italy, indicate that it embodied the lex talionis [law of retaliation, i.e., an eye for an eye] and other severe features exemplified in the later Greek code of DracoDraco
or Dracon
, fl. 621 B.C., Athenian politician and law codifier. Of his codification of Athenian customary law only the section dealing with involuntary homicide is preserved.
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Minos, we learn, was the primitive founder of the government of Crete, as Zaleucus was of that of the Locrians.
Zaleucus was the legislator of the Western Locrians, as was Charondas, the Catanean, of his own cities, and those also in Italy and Sicily which belonged to the Calcidians.
Legal Light was bred from a British stallion called Zaleucus and a mare called Portia.
outsider theme: according to Aristotle, Zaleucus was a slave shepherd
Also portrayed was the Greek Zaleucus, who gouged out one of his own eyes as he also imposed that punishment on his son for violating the law.
From the unwritten laws of Lycurgus that created the foundations of the Spartan state, to the written laws of Solon in Athens, to Hippodamus on civic planning, Zaleucus on the divine source of laws, Philolaus on family laws and much more, Early Greek Lawgivers offers a fascinating glimpse into ideas and lives of notable figures in classical Greek history.
And the Locrians observed this custom in latter ages, being compelled to the observance of it by Zaleucus, their law-giver, whose rigour in executing this law is very remarkable; for having caught his son in Adultery, he resolved to deprive him of his sight, and remained a long time inexorable .