Zheleznogorsk


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Zheleznogorsk

 

a city in Kursk Oblast, RSFSR. The city is situated on the Moscow-Kiev highway, 130 km north-west of Kursk and 4 km from the Mikhailovskii Rudnik rail-road station, the terminal point on a 52-km branch of the Briansk-L’gov line. Population, 31,000 (1970). The city originated as a settlement in 1957, when the Mikhailovka deposit (the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly) began to be worked; it was designated a city in 1962. The city has an iron-ore combine as well as a combine that manufactures corrugated containers and a plant that manufactures reinforced concrete products; construction of an ore-dressing combine was begun in 1972. There is a mining and metallurgical technicum.

References in periodicals archive ?
91 in Zheleznogorsk Ksenia Smelova, Alexander Stasenko, Dmitry Shabinsky, Vladislav Unzhakov.
In addition to sailing along the north coast of Siberia, the nuclear waste cargo vessel can make voyages up the Siberian Rivers like Ob and Yenisei, where several of Russia's nuclear facilities are located, like the storage and planned reprocessing plant in Zheleznogorsk (former Krasnoyarsk-26).
RSCC includes five teleports - Satellite Communications Centers (SCC): Dubna, Bear Lakes, Skolkovo, Zheleznogorsk, Khabarovsk and the Shabolovka Technical Center in Moscow as well as its own high-speed optical-fiber digital network.
Zheleznogorsk, 2,200 miles |east of Moscow, was established in 1950 to make nuclear weapons.
Kijong-dong's eerie twin can be found in the shape of Zheleznogorsk, one of the former Soviet Union's 'closed cities'.
The company's share on the fixed broadband Internet market in Zheleznogorsk currently stands at 58% and its fiber-to-the-building (FTTB) network covers 98% of households in the town.
BUT Zheleznogorsk is a closed administrative territory of Krasnoyarsk region Population of BUT Zheleznogorsk mostly consists of Russians.
It would then focus funding on helping to redirect engineers and technicians associated with the shutdown of Russia's plutonium production reactors in Seversk and Zheleznogorsk (this program is described below).
years in the formerly secret Siberian city of Zheleznogorsk.
The Zheleznogorsk City Administration subsequently promised to allot a new building to the ROAC, but had not done so by the end of the reporting period.
New Zealand contributions are being put towards the establishment of alternative power options in Zheleznogorsk so that the last Russian plutonium producing nuclear reactor, which provides critical heat and electricity for two closed Siberian cities, can be decommissioned.
The ADE-4 and ADE-5 reactors in Seversk near Tomsk, western Siberia, and the ADE-2 reactor in Zheleznogorsk, eastern Siberia, generate enough plutonium to produce approximately one nuclear weapon every day and a half.

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