Zhukovskii

Zhukovskii

 

a city in Moscow Oblast, RSFSR. Situated on the Moscow River, near the Otdykh railroad station, 40 km southeast of Moscow. Population, 76,000 (1971; 11,000, 1939). Zhukovskii was formed in 1947 from the settlement of Stakhanovo and named in honor of the Russian scholar N. E. Zhukovskii.

References in periodicals archive ?
A March 1938 instruction from Deputy People's Commissar of the NKVD Semen Borisovich Zhukovskii ordered all Gulag camps to organize invalids' subdivisions with workshops for consumer production, where the inmates would be held separately from the able-bodied and counted off the labor inventory.
36) Natalia Il'ina was more reserved in her observations, usually confining them to two horizontal marks in the margin or, rarely, a notation; these occurred principally in books on history or in those devoted to the poetry of Pushkin, Lermontov, or Zhukovskii.
Derzhavin, Zhukovskii, Batiushkov)," in The Pushkin Handbook, ed.
Sumarokov had the ability to sharpen and focus Fleming's images and to make more concrete Fleming's sometimes hazy concepts--a potential perhaps somehow inherent in the Russian language itself, since it also was to characterize the work of Russia's greatest poet-translator, Vasilii Andreevich Zhukovskii (1783-1852).
It is preceded by the prose of Akhmatova, Belyi, Blok, Gippius, Esenin, Mandelshtam, Mariengof, Maiakovskii, Pasternak, Voznesenskii, Vysotskii, and Zhukovskii.
Zhukovskii, for example, at the time of his editorship of Vestnik Evropy (1808-10) translated and published a number of contes orientales (see M.
Introduced by Zhukovskii to translate Ludwig Uhland's 'Die Rache', the form acquired its definitive embodiment in Pushkin's 1820 ballad 'The Black Shawl'.
4) Mikhail Zhukovskii, "Zamechaniia na zapisku ob ustroistve zemledel'cheskoi, manufakturnoi i torgovoi kompanii," appendix to Enikilopov, Griboedov v Gruzii, 130-57.
Many of Russia's major nineteenth-century writers, among them Lermontov, Pushkin, Zhukovskii, Fet, Dostoevskii, and Tolstoi also translated, and in the twentieth century so too did Pasternak, Akhmatova, Zoshchenko, Babel', and Tsvetaeva, with the difference that whereas in the nineteenth century writers translated voluntarily, often in order to improve their own literary style, in the Soviet period the great writers who translated did so frequently under duress, because they were unable to publish their own original work.
Sympathy for the Greeks was demonstrably linked to an awakening Russian fascination with classical antiquity, as Prousis shows in his discussion of its impact on Russian literature in works by Krylov, Batiushkov, Del'vig, Zhukovskii, and Gnedich whose Iliad (1829) was a major cultural event of the time.