abbey

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abbey,

monastic house, especially among Benedictines and Cistercians, consisting of not less than 12 monks or nuns ruled by an abbot or abbess. Many abbeys were originally self-supporting. In the Benedictine expansion after the 8th cent., abbeys were often important centers of learning and peaceful arts and, like FuldaFulda
, city (1994 pop. 58,710), Hesse, central Germany, on the Fulda River. It is a banking and financial center. Manufactures include textiles and clothing. Fulda grew around a Benedictine abbey founded in 744 by Sturmius, a pupil of St. Boniface, the missionary.
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, were sometimes the nuclei of future towns. The buildings surround a church and include a dormitory, refectory, and guest house, all surrounded by a wall. The courtyard, derived from the Roman atriumatrium
, term for an interior court in Roman domestic architecture and also for a type of entrance court in early Christian churches. The Roman atrium was an unroofed or partially roofed area with rooms opening from it. In early times its center held a cooking hearth.
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, was a usual feature, as was the cloistercloister,
unroofed space forming part of a religious establishment and surrounded by the various buildings or by enclosing walls. Generally, it is provided on all sides with a vaulted passageway consisting of continuous colonnades or arcades opening onto a court.
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 or arcade surrounding the court. Cluniac abbeys were always ornate, Cistercian ones notably bare. The CarthusiansCarthusians
, small order of monks of the Roman Catholic Church [Lat. abbr.,=O. Cart.]. It was established by St. Bruno at La Grande Chartreuse (see Chartreuse, Grande) in France in 1084.
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 with their special polity developed an altogether different structure called the charterhouse.

Abbey

The monastic buildings of religious bodies governed by an abbot or abbess.

Abbey

 

a Catholic monastery governed by a father superior or, in a convent, by a mother superior, subordinate to a bishop and sometimes directly to the pope. The larger and wealthier monasteries owned much land and often played an important religious, political, and economic role in feudal Western Europe. Such monasteries included the abbeys of Cluny, Saint-Denis, Port Royal, Saint Gall, Fulda, and Monte Cassino. During the Reformation and especially during the bourgeois revolution, the abbey lost its significance in the life of European society. Many abbeys were liquidated, but some still exist today.

What does it mean when you dream about an abbey?

Dreaming of a convent or monastery may indicate that the dreamer needs to spend some time alone reflecting, or even needs to seek spiritual nourishment. Alternatively, it may symbolize isolation from the normal flow of life.

abbey

abbey: Plan of abbey of St. Germain-des-Prés, Paris, 13th cent. A, church; B, cloister; C, city gate; E, chapter house; F, chapel; G, refectory; H, cellars and presses; I, abbot’s lodging; K, ditches; L, gardens
A monastery or convent; particularly the church thereof.

abbey

1. a building inhabited by a community of monks or nuns governed by an abbot or abbess
2. a church built in conjunction with such a building
3. such a community of monks or nuns
References in classic literature ?
Here, Jew, step forth Look at that holy Father Aymer, Prior of the rich Abbey of Jorvaulx, and tell us at what ransom we should hold him?
So he made haste and came running up to the door of the abbey, and knocked loudly for admittance.
He is, I am afraid, a very sceptical person, for when I asked him about the bells at sea and the White Lady at the abbey he said very brusquely,"I wouldn't fash masel' about them, miss.
No grand company was come except the Irwines, for whom the carriage had been sent early, and Arthur was at that moment not in a back room, but walking with the rector into the broad stone cloisters of the old abbey, where the long tables were laid for all the cottage tenants and the farm-servants.
The kitchen-garden, one of the longest claws of the abbey, extended to Monk's camp.
Thus, in order to indicate here only the principal details, while the little Red Door almost attains to the limits of the Gothic delicacy of the fifteenth century, the pillars of the nave, by their size and weight, go back to the Carlovingian Abbey of Saint-Germain des Prés.
But," quoth Robin, "Fountain Abbey is a good hundred miles from here.
Yet the scene in the dining-room of the Abbey Grange was sufficiently strange to arrest his attention and to recall his waning interest.
Just past the weir (going up) is Danes' Field, where the invading Danes once encamped, during their march to Gloucestershire; and a little further still, nestling by a sweet corner of the stream, is what is left of Medmenham Abbey.
His spirit must be chastened, as must that of many more in this Abbey.
And there, not far from the great west door of the Abbey he, already an elderly man, began his new busy life.
Speaking of Rachel reminds me--did you hear anything about the Abbey Bank lately, Anne?