abjection


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

abjection

[ab′jek·shən]
(mycology)
The discharge or casting off of spores by the spore-bearing structure of a fungus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abjection lives in the dark heart and I experience my repulsion/desire: a bodily experience of the visceral and domestic, this link to food, to body.
By sketching in the details of Manfred's childhood, Wilson indicates the origins of his protagonist's personal abjection.
If we claim that pop-cultural conventions for representing birth are in fact strategies of coping with the abjection entailed by birth, why is laughter inappropriate for displacing the unrepresentability of the birthing body, while strapping it to monitors and cutting it open have become the predominant representations in Polish popular culture?
Further, its diction presciently, if unwittingly, gestures towards Julia Kristeva's theory of abjection, developed in her seminal text, Powers of Horror (1982).
It might be argued that Northern Ireland--a territorial and signifying space whose meanings and boundaries have been so violently contested, a body politic sustained and racked by anomalous and permeable partition--has been in the condition of abjection since its foundation.
Tearing the Goat's Flesh: Crisis, Abjection, and Homosexuality in the Production of a Late-Twentieth-Century Black Masculinity.
It is the enormous accomplishment of Wendy Wall's new book to make the Early Modern household the pulsing heart of the nation, the crucible where gendered and sexed subjects took shape, and the locus for powerful fantasies of abjection, empowerment, nurturance, and violence.
Abjection explains the appeal of degenerationlsm from the ahistorical perspective of psychoanalysis.
To do this, these authors embrace the state of abjection into which a larger national/imperial power places them, and then use the Gothic to show how their nation/region is actually empowered through this abjection.
In this study, Danticat's novel Breath, Eyes, Memory is examined through the lens of abjection theory of psychoanalysis.
The term 'abject art' was used by the philosopher Julia M Kristeva in her book from 1980, Powers of Horror: An Essay in Abjection.
Drawing on the concept of abjection (Butler 1993; Kristeva 1982), I ultimately argue that the discursive construction of these women as social waste simultaneously organizes the narratives of Canadian and Mexican newspapers, as well as the historically grounded social construction of gender and race in these two countries (Glenn 1999).