ablaut


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to ablaut: metathesis, umlaut, suppletion

ablaut

(äp`lout) [Ger.,=off-sound], in inflectioninflection,
in grammar. In many languages, words or parts of words are arranged in formally similar sets consisting of a root, or base, and various affixes. Thus walking, walks, walker have in common the root walk and the affixes -ing, -s, and -er.
..... Click the link for more information.
, vowel variation (as in English sing, sang, sung, song) caused by former differences in syllabic accent. In a prehistoric period the corresponding inflected forms of the language (known through internal reconstruction) had differences in accent rather than in vowel. Phonological change resulted in alteration of syllable structure and in vowel gradation. See umlautumlaut
[Ger.,=transformed sound], in inflection, variation of vowels of the type of English man to men. In this instance it is the end product of the effect of a y (long since disappeared) that was present in the plural; the y
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
The framework of alternations as put forward by Kastovsky (1968) constitutes a double synthesis: firstly, of contrasts motivated by ablaut and by other phenomena and, secondly, of synchronic and diachronic facts.
2001, Ablaut als Umlaut im Ostjakischen: Prinzipien und Grundzuge der lautgeschichtlichen Betrachtung.
Can there be notional reasons for selection of a particular declension, given that in all of these declensions there is not the problem that ablaut is paradigmatically relevant, and given the simplifications of their historical post-root structure and the formal convergences among them?
2004 "The n-less versus -n past participle forms of certain ablaut verbs in seventeenth and eighteenth century American and British English", Studia Anglica Posnaniensia 40: 193-208.
Since the Tocharian PP is obviously cognate in its reduplication and endings with the perfect participle of the classical IE languages, the task is to explain how it came to be paired semantically with the preterite, which continues the PIE aorist--while the (proto-)perfect with *o ~ *[empty set] ablaut became one of the sources of the Tocharian subjunctive.
The verbal systems of the two languages besides inflexions and ablaut alterations employ the prefix as an additional marker of the preterite participle.
The distinction based on a consonantal change might have prevented the secondary distinction by vowel Ablaut.
As far as the origin of this form is concerned, it has been viewed as an augmentless aorist (rather than an original perfect) with the -es ending (s voiced to z and lost in Proto-Germanic) and ablaut alternations according to the pattern of preterite ind.
My one quibble here concerns the inclusion of the ablaut patterns of root nouns under the same heading as suffixed nouns on the assumption that they had a zero-suffix.
The majority of publications in the field of ablaut verbs finish their analyses at the turn of the fifteenth century.
Do students really need the knowledge of Proto-Indo-European ablaut series to understand Old English strong verbs?
The distinction between passive and active by Ablaut of the prefix vowel is, of course, only relevant for those languages that preserve internal passives.