aborigines


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aborigines:

see Australian aboriginesAustralian aborigines,
native people of Australia who probably first came from somewhere in Asia more than 40,000 years ago. Genetic evidence also suggests that c.4,000 years there was an additional migration of people who were related to the inhabitants of modern India.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Maybe the Aussies should look to their indigenous Aborigines to improve their cricket.
Since the aborigines lived where the debris flow occurred, their future risk is higher than that of other ethnic groups.
Prior of the traditional aborigine dance show leaders hold conversation with each other
It addresses the employment, education and welfare challenges faced by Aborigines and calls for substantial changes, including the introduction of a national "healthy welfare" card for all, a significant reduction in the number of income support payments and bans on young people accessing welfare unless they are training or in work.
She reports these people as regarding it as unfortunate that 'coconut' Aborigines (2010, p.
The bill is largely symbolic and does not establish or guarantee any particular rights for Aborigines.
If one could observe very closely the features of Whoopi Goldberg, he would have no doubt that she is a descendant of an Aborigine.
Polis had posted racist remarks about Liam Jurrah, an Aborigine and one of the Demons' star players.
Taiwan s aborigines belong to the same language family, as do the people who migrated across the Pacific as far as Eastern Island off the coast of Chile in prehistoric times.
This paper focuses on one particular site of tourist production, Lake Tyers Aboriginal station in Victoria, one of many sites in the southeast where Aborigines chose to engage in tourism, each with its own particular character and distinctive historical trajectory.
Australian Aborigines share as much DNA with Denisovans as do New Guineans, the researchers say.
Mary visits a nearby Aborigine housing estate, or so-called reserve, where she is stunned by the conditions.