abrade


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abrade

[ə′brād]
(geology)
To wear away by abrasion or friction.

abrade

To wear away or scrape off a surface, especially by friction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gary's mother Julie, of Abe Raman, near Abrade, added, "Such a short sentence is no deterrent to other butchers who may be tempted to cut corners like he did.
Thus, Anti-Crobe resins will not abrade or scratch off, ensuring continued product performance.
Using a piece of rough sandpaper abrade the surface all over forming a pattern of your choice as you go.
Thermage: A radio frequency device that doesn't abrade and shrinks existing collagen fibers, and it spurs the body to generate more collagen, causing more tightening months later.
Dr Thomas Gent, of the Association of Gynaecologists in Hamburg, says: 'G-strings can abrade and injure the sensitive skin around the genital area - especially if they are too tight or made with badly stitched material.
No pedestrian gestures to glaze the eye; no taped electronic ephemera to abrade the ear; no agendas to manipulate the sensibilities.
All samples except the Alcryn MPR showed a tendency to abrade, scrap can be recycled repeatedly with no detrimental effect on performance or appearance, according to the company.
Chronic competitive pressure, he further warned, could abrade, Zmirak omits the yeomanly efforts of conservative Christian economist Ralph Ancil to keep the flame of Ropke's wisdom burning.
On the other hand, he allowed that the "natural" authority of parents could at times abrade the civil right of children to receive "adequate instruction," thus conjuring the authority of the state to override that of the parent.
Richard Price, consumer advisor for the American Dental Association: "Be aware the jewels could abrade the lip.
Another provision requires that on vacancy in a pre-1960 unit, the owner has to make the apartment paint intact and clean, and fix binding doors and windows so they don't abrade and create dust.