abreaction


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abreaction

[‚ab·rē′ak·shən]
(psychology)
In psychoanalytic theory, the weakening or elimination of anxiety by reexperiencing, either through imagination or in reality, the original anxiety-provoking experience.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of a recent British survey (Wilson 2002) imply that drug-induced abreaction may become entirely obsolete during the present century.
Finally, there was general agreement that th e DD field has seen significant evolution away from a treatment model that focuses primarily on abreaction of traumatic memories toward a greater clinical emphasis on ego-strengthening and the maintenance of adequate functioning in the present.
Clarification, which is "[the organization and reflection of conscious material] back to the patient a clearer, less distorted picture of the confusing array of thoughts, feeling, and behavior" (Glick & Meyerson, 1980), is not often used by peer counselors because it is a very complicated mix of suggestion, abreaction, and manipulation.
Central to the exhibition was an installation by Mike Kelley and Paul McCarthy consisting of various pieces and entitled Midlife Crisis Trauma Center and Negative Media-Engram Abreaction Release Zone, 1992.
Catharsis is the basis of abreaction, which calls forth repressed material in order to purge it.
Of critical importance is being able to maintain the emotional environment for group members and being fully present in the moment -- particularly during instances of catharsis or abreaction.
Pure abreaction can be harmful (and it can result in overwhelming re-experiencing of intense emotions) because the same modes of coping (numbing, dissociation, denial) can be re-enacted as in the initial trauma.
In abreaction and other procedures which utilize the patient's ability to place himself in situations, the therapist often consciously or unconsciously takes the role of one or more of the people involved, thus becoming an auxiliary ego.
In this paper I discuss the evolution of using hypnosis with children, and the hypnotic techniques and methods that tap into their imaginations which can heal abreactions to negative situations or habits.
However, this does not involve a therapist merely attempting to facilitate the trauma disclosure, or allow for abreactions (Ford, 2009).