absolute scale


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absolute scale

[′ab·sə‚lüt ‚skāl]
(thermodynamics)

Kelvin

A thermometer scale starting at absolute zero (approximately −273°C) and having degrees of the same magnitude as those of the Celsius thermometer. Thus, 0°C = 273 K. Named after first Lord Kelvin (1824–1907). Also called an absolute scale.
References in periodicals archive ?
Measurement of statistical evidence on an absolute scale following thermodynamic principles.
In the top panel of Table 3, we use an absolute scale to tally failures (observations of banks that failed within a year of the reported capital ratio) and nonfailures (observations of banks that did not fail within a year) for individual capital ratio ranges and cumulatively up to a given cutoff point.
Why do we need to use absolute scale of temperature (Kelvin degrees) when we already have a perfectly logical ordinary temperature scale (in degrees Celsius) that serves us well in our normal daily activities?
1992) showed that these results did not stem from any inherent insensitivity of the fractal index, but reflected basic similarities in the complexity of pathways despite their differences on an absolute scale.
max] against the reciprocal of cure temperature expressed in absolute scale is found to be a straight line.
Kelvin proposed that a new absolute scale of temperature be created, based on absolute zero as the zero point.
The major task of environmental macroeconomics is to design an economic institution analogous to the Plimsoll mark--to keep the weight, the absolute scale, of the economy from sinking our biospheric ark.