absolution

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absolution

Christianity
a. a formal remission of sin pronounced by a priest in the sacrament of penance
b. the prescribed form of words granting such a remission
References in periodicals archive ?
For many years in the United States, including in the Archdiocese of Boston, diocesan bishops have granted their priests the faculty to absolve the sin of abortion.
If you remove a person's debt, you also absolve them of their personal responsibility to repay the debt.
Peter Lockley, from the litigation team at Blythe Liggins Solicitors, said that motorists involved in accidents could not absolve themselves from blame by relying on adverse weather conditions.
There may have been an element of naivety on the part of the man, but that doesn't absolve the fact that Kirklees Council did not issue an all-important schedule of works and was cohesive in the project throughout, albeit through word of mouth and telephone by the sounds of it.
ABSOLVE YOURSELF Make a list and never shop on an empty stomach.
Yes, to speak it now, and thus absolve it // like a read word.
This does not absolve the institution of the responsibility of educating and supporting these individuals to the very best of their abilities; however, it does mean that an institution cannot give a student one test at the end of four years and declare them forevermore failures or successes in life.
The demise of Christendom is therefore a very good thing for the church, because it frees the church from having to defend or absolve the state in its dirty work.
At the same time, even a legitimate defense of national security does not absolve a power of moral responsibility for the outcomes of its "precision" military strikes.
Moral science alone is not enough either to condemn man or to absolve them, but it does suffice to distinguish good from evil, and it sees to it that vice is not exalted into virtue.
Anderson examines the court martial that investigated the mutiny, the subsequent careers of Bligh, the mutineers, and the chief mutineers, Fletcher Christian and Peter Heywood (who were from powerful, politically connected families who were able to use connections to rewrite history to absolve themselves of blame), and comes to new conclusions.
As I showed in my column, even some reviewers who absolve Solzhenitsyn of bigotry, such as Richard Pipes and John Klier, acknowledge this fact.