suture

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Related to absorbable suture: sutured, absorbable suture material, synthetic suture, Surgical sutures

suture

1. Surgery
a. catgut, silk thread, or wire used to stitch together two bodily surfaces
b. the surgical seam formed after joining two surfaces
2. Anatomy a type of immovable joint, esp between the bones of the skull (cranial suture)
3. Zoology a line of junction in a mollusc shell, esp the line between adjacent chambers of a nautiloid shell
4. Botany a line marking the point of dehiscence in a seed pod or capsule

Suture

 

the surgical uniting, chiefly by a surgical needle and suture material, of tissues cut during surgery or separated by an injury. Threads made of silk, linen, or Dacron and other polymeric materials are used in superficial sutures. In buried sutures, which are applied to internal organs and tissues, absorbable materials, such as catgut or biologically inert polymeric threads, are used; buried sutures are not removed.

One type of superficial suture, cosmetic suture, which is applied to the face, is made using threads of horsehair or thin ca-pron. Osteorrhaphy (osteosynthesis) is a type of buried suture. Primary, primo-secondary, and secondary sutures are distinguished on the basis of when the sutures are applied, which depends on the type of wound. The sutureless union of tissues is achieved with various adhesives made from polymeric materials (for example, cyanoacrylate) or with metal clamps.

suture

[′sü·chər]
(biology)
A distinguishable line of union between two closely united parts.
(medicine)
A fine thread used to close a wound or surgical incision.
References in periodicals archive ?
Breakthrough Peer Review Clinical Study Finds INSORB Staples Superior To Absorbable Suture For Closure of Contaminated Wounds
Various permanent and delayed absorbable sutures are available.
Tissue reaction and surface morphology of absorbable sutures after in vivo exposure.
I use 3-0 prolonged, delayed, absorbable sutures, in one or two layers.
Currently available synthetic monofilament absorbable sutures can take as many as 180 days to absorb, and other absorbable options, such as gut sutures, have weaker tensile strength and can be brittle, compromising knot security.
Simon Williams, President and CEO of Tepha, stated, "We are delighted that the FDA has cleared the TephaFLEX Absorbable Suture, and determined that devices of this type will be regulated as class II (510k) devices.
There has been a distinct shift towards painless wound closure with significant change occurring in certain segments such as absorbable sutures, skin adhesives and tissue sealants," notes Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst Kezia Jasper.
PRODUCT ANALYSIS II-14 Surgical Stapler Products II-14 Stapler Products: Replacement for Manual Suturing II-14 Sutures Products II-15 Sweeping Changes in the Kinds of Suture Material Used II-15 Applications of Sutures II-15 Sutures Classification II-16 Absorbable and Non-Absorbable Surgical Suture II-16 Monofilament and Multifilament II-16 Absorbable Suture Materials II-16 Surgical Gut or Catgut II-16 Chromic Gut II-16 Fast-Absorbing Gut II-16 Polyglycolic Acid II-17 Polyglactin II-17 Polydioxanone II-17 Polytrimethylene Carbonate II-17 Polyglecaprone II-17 Uses of Absorbable Sutures II-18 Characteristics of Absorbable Sutures II-18
Procurement According Specification Absorbable Suture Yarn Lot 1; Nonabsorbable Suture Yarn Lot 2.
Figure 37: Non Absorbable Sutures, India, Revenue ($m), USD Constant, Forecast, 2011-2018 63
New V-Loc[TM] device enables knotless soft tissue repair, offering the most significant advance since absorbable sutures