abstinence


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abstinence:

see fastingfasting,
partial or temporary abstinence from food, a widely used form of asceticism. Among the stricter Jews the principal fast is the Day of Atonement, or Yom Kippur; in Islam the faithful fast all the daytime hours of the month of Ramadan. Fasting is general in Christianity.
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; temperance movementstemperance movements,
organized efforts to induce people to abstain—partially or completely—from alcoholic beverages. Such movements occurred in ancient times, but ceased until the wide use of distilled liquors in the modern period resulted in increasing drunkenness.
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abstinence

Chiefly RC Church the practice of refraining from specific kinds of food or drink, esp from meat, as an act of penance
References in classic literature ?
The result was that I was no longer reinvigorated by periods of open-air abstinence and healthy toil.
And, more than that, he took the Total Abstinence Pledge, and promised to turn over a new leaf.
In the honour given to rulers, in the abstinence of the warrior class from agriculture, handicrafts, and trade in general, in the institution of common meals, and in the attention paid to gymnastics and military training--in all these respects this State will resemble the former.
Some precautions, it may be; but temperance, sir, is one thing, and abstinence another.
But I have heard that, with some persons, temperance - that is, moderation - is almost impossible; and if abstinence be an evil
And not only need we breathe and exercise the soul by assuming the penalties of abstinence, of debt, of solitude, of unpopularity,--but it behooves the wise man to look with a bold eye into those rarer dangers which sometimes invade men, and to familiarize himself with disgusting forms of disease, with sounds of execration, and the vision of violent death.
On the contrary, every person in this house was perfect master of his own time: and as he might at his pleasure satisfy all his appetites within the restrictions only of law, virtue, and religion; so he might, if his health required, or his inclination prompted him to temperance, or even to abstinence, absent himself from any meals, or retire from them, whenever he was so disposed, without even a sollicitation to the contrary: for, indeed, such sollicitations from superiors always savour very strongly of commands.
There had been in the past a fool of a doctor who had prescribed total abstinence for Nutty, and Elizabeth knew this.
After all, perhaps, the plainest course for persons of such tender consciences, would be, a total abstinence from tavern-keeping.
Business disposed of, Mr Swiveller was inwardly reminded of its being nigh dinner-time, and to the intent that his health might not be endangered by longer abstinence, dispached a message to the nearest eating-house requiring an immediate supply of boiled beef and greens for two.
The editorial also noted that abstinence is indeed 100% effective, as a personal choice--but not as a public-health program used at a population level, which will always have a failure rate.