abstract

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abstract

1. denoting art characterized by geometric, formalized, or otherwise nonrepresentational qualities
2. Philosophy (of an idea) functioning for some empiricists as the meaning of a general term
3. an abstract painting, sculpture, etc.

Abstract

 

a brief oral or written summary of a book, a scientific or scholarly work, or the results of a scientific or scholarly study. An abstract generally aims to provide scientific or scholarly information. The dissertation abstract written by those seeking the degree of candidate or doctor of sciences is a summary of the dissertation’s chief scholarly and theoretical propositions.

References in classic literature ?
I cannot by any effort of thought conceive the abstract idea above described.
There has been a late excellent and deservedly esteemed philosopher who, no doubt, has given it very much countenance, by seeming to think the having abstract general ideas is what puts the widest difference in point of understanding betwixt man and beast.
the change of motion is proportional to the impressed force,' or that 'whatever has extension is divisible,' these propositions are to be understood of motion and extension in general; and nevertheless it will not follow that they suggest to my thoughts an idea of motion without a body moved, or any determinate direction and velocity, or that I must conceive an abstract general idea of extension, which is neither line, surface, nor solid, neither great nor small, black, white, nor red, nor of any other determinate colour.
And here it is to be noted that I do not deny absolutely there are general ideas, but only that there are any ABSTRACT general ideas; for, in the passages we have quoted wherein there is mention of general ideas, it is always supposed that they are formed by abstraction, after the manner set forth in sections 8 and 9.
Berkeley's view in the above passage, which is essentially the same as Hume's, does not wholly agree with modern psychology, although it comes nearer to agreement than does the view of those who believe that there are in the mind single contents which can be called abstract ideas.
Suppose that in the end you had an abstract memory-image of the different appearances presented by the negro on different occasions, but no memory-image of any one of the single appearances.
It certainly could not be refuted by a philosophy such as Kant's, in which, no less than in the previously mentioned systems, the history of the human mind and the nature of language are almost wholly ignored, and the certainty of objective knowledge is transferred to the subject; while absolute truth is reduced to a figment, more abstract and narrow than Plato's ideas, of 'thing in itself,' to which, if we reason strictly, no predicate can be applied.
It is a method which does not divorce the present from the past, or the part from the whole, or the abstract from the concrete, or theory from fact, or the divine from the human, or one science from another, but labours to connect them.
I would put myself in the attitude to look in the eye an abstract truth, and I cannot.
Especially take the same ground in regard to abstract truth, the science of the mind.
Miss Miggs remarked, and very justly, as an abstract sentiment which happened to occur to her at the moment, that she dared to say the locksmith and his wife would murmur, and repine, if they were ever, by forcible abduction, or otherwise, to lose their child; but that we seldom knew, in this world, what was best for us: such being our sinful and imperfect natures, that very few arrived at that clear understanding.
Authors will be able to submit abstracts to topics that are a combination the listing from the call for papers as well as those that have been proposed from our community.