abyssal hill

abyssal hill

[ə′bis·əl ′hil]
(geology)
A hill 2000 to 3000 feet (600 to 900 meters) high and a few miles wide within the deep ocean.
References in periodicals archive ?
Remarkably delicate abyssal hill lineations appear.
Geophysicist John Crowley, now at Engineering Seismology Group Canada in Kingston, and colleagues noticed that the abyssal hills that line the ocean floor between Australia and Antarctica appear to have been laid down during these sea level lows.
Caption: Abyssal hills, which run parallel to the mid-ocean rift (yellow, center) in this seafloor map, formed when lower sea levels led to large magma outpourings at mid-ocean ridges.
For the first time, the orientation and the length of these abyssal hills could be accurately measured.
in terms of sheer surface area, they can't compare to deep-sea ridges called abyssal hills, which cover 60 to 70 percent of Earth's face.
Some theories about abyssal hills suggest that they develop through eruptions along the midocean ridges.