accelerando


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accelerando

Music
1. (to be performed) with increasing speed
2. an increase in speed
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References in periodicals archive ?
As a "serious" teacher that incorporates a significant amount of popular music (pop and jazz) into piano lessons, I have to say that Accelerando may be my new favorite theory curriculum.
The fun starts when you make a large-scale decrescendo or crescendo or ritard or accelerando.
As the Allegro approaches, there is a crescendo but no accelerando.
For many works, files are also available in three derivative formats: Humdrum, developed by David Huron of the Ohio State University, for complex analytical and comparative operations; MIDI1, intended for printing and analysis applications; and MIDI+, optimized for listening and teaching with realization of ornaments and repeats, observation of tempo indications such as accelerando and ritardando, and MIDI orchestrations that best approximate the sound of the original work.
Her strict adherence to the composer's markings precludes a real accelerando until just before the end, and her insistence on the left-hand upper-voice accents ultimately becomes monotonous.
Indications of rubato, accelerando, allargando and the like, in combination with rhythmic complexities, dynamic shadings, and special effects (sul tasto, sul ponticello, pizzicato, harmonics, tremolo, heaviest mute possible), contribute to the technical challenges but also enhance Lazarof's intended flexibility of expression.
verbal or written instructions giving concrete verbal instructions (CM), for example, markings such as crescendo, ritardando, accelerando and so on
Authors divide rhythmic deviation into two categories: simple accelerando and ritardando, in which the singer and accompanist quicken or slow together, and actual tempo rubato, in which the accompanist maintains a firm, steady tempo, while the singer alters the speed and rhythm of the melodic line.
Turk also states that a bit of accelerando ("somewhat hastened") and ritardando ("increasing hesitation") could be used in certain instances, for example, accelerando ".
An accelerando starting with a pianissimo at the bridge leads to a spectacular conflagration of arpeggios, double stops, and sixty-fourth notes ending with a heart-s topping pp harmonic and a solid and satisfying [C[MUSICAL NOTES NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
For example, you could construct a symbol such as accelerando - - - in which each dash increases the tempo by a defined amount, causing the music to accelerate during playback according to your specifications.