acceptable risk


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Related to acceptable risk: Risk assessment

acceptable risk

[ak¦sep·tə·bəl ′risk]
(geophysics)
In seismology, that level of earthquake effects which is judged to be of sufficiently low social and economic consequence, and which is useful for determining design requirements in structures or for taking certain actions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new edition further characterizes a manufacturer's policy for determining acceptable risk as "essential" and recommends, as one option, matrices (examples provided in Annex D), which document the combinations of probability of harm and severity of harm that are acceptable or unacceptable.
Toxic air pollution creates a cancer risk for Connecticut citizens that is 850 times greater than the acceptable risk set by the EPA," says the alliance.
The DOE said the cleanup falls into the EPA's acceptable risk range of one in a million to one in 10,000 additional cancers from exposure to radiation on the site.
In combat, the specific mission objectives may make the level of acceptable risk fairly clear.
Nasrallah said 43% of doctors agreed that diabetes is an acceptable risk factor, and a slightly higher percentage said that weight gain was an acceptable risk factor in selecting a drug therapy.
but, regarding trees, there is usually a sense that not much can be done, that chances of hazard tree accidents are remote enough to be an acceptable risk, or the love of trees outweighs the hazards.
Defining what is and is not an acceptable risk is the legacy of AIDS treatment activism.
Warren argues that during the debates throughout the century, the definition of acceptable risk had to be negotiated and this negotiation was often controlled by industry, which funded the scientific research on which acceptable blood lead levels were determined.
The levels are compared with acceptable risk ranges.
The main worry with anticoagulation is the potential for bleeding, but this is an acceptable risk, since without treatment you have a one in four chance of having a stroke in five years.
Since such regulations inevitably tend to be somewhat overbroad, an ironic result would be to bar an occasional individual with compromised vision from particular jobs even though the employer in question, left to its own discretion and knowing in some detail what the job does and does not require, would have judged him an acceptable risk.
If these first studies demonstrate an acceptable risk, researchers may move to larger studies to get a sense of the possible usefulness.