acceptor atom

Acceptor atom

An impurity atom in a semiconductor which can accept or take up one or more electrons from the crystal and become negatively charged. An atom which substitutes for a regular atom of the material but has one less valence electron may be expected to be an acceptor atom. For example, atoms of boron, aluminum, gallium, or indium are acceptors in germanium and silicon (illus. a), and atoms of antimony and bismuth are acceptors in tellurium crystals. Acceptor atoms tend to increase the number of holes (positive charge carriers) in the semiconductor (illus. b). The energy gained when an electron is taken up by an acceptor atom from the valence band of the crystal is the ionization energy of the atom. See Donor atom, Semiconductor

Trivalent acceptor atom, boron (B), in the elemental semiconductor silicon (Si)enlarge picture
Trivalent acceptor atom, boron (B), in the elemental semiconductor silicon (Si)

acceptor atom

[ak′sep·tər ′ad·əm]
(solid-state physics)
An atom of a substance added to a semiconductor crystal to increase the number of holes in the conduction band.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydrogen bonding is defined as intermolecular bonding between an electron deficient A--H donor group and an electron rich acceptor atom B.
When atoms of these two kinds interact, a re-arrangement of the electron distribution occurs; an electron from the donor atom migrates to the acceptor atom thereby making the acceptor atom negatively charged and the donor atom positively charged.
HyperChem creates a hydrogen bond if the distance between the donor hydrogen and acceptor atom is less than 3.
In principle these donor and acceptor atoms enable to form a significant number of different hydrogen bond pattern (HBP).