acoustic cavitation


Also found in: Medical.

acoustic cavitation

[ə‚kü·stik ‚kav·ə′tā·shən]
(fluid mechanics)
The formation of vapor-filled bubbles in a liquid during the short periodic intervals of negative pressure, or tensile stress, that accompany the passage of a sound wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, acoustic cavitation involves sending sound waves in the ultrasonic frequency range (>20 kHz) through a liquid medium.
It employs the acoustic cavitation of microbubbles to enhance delivery of these large molecules.
The extraction process was assisted by sonication which is based on the sonochemical phenomenon associated with acoustic cavitation [11] that helps the disruption of cell walls and facilitate the release of contents [12].
The sonochemical effect of the acoustic cavitation in liquid causes a significant shortening between the range of chemical transformation and a continuous formation, growth and explosive collapse of the bubbles.
Acoustic cavitation produced by US exposure is believed to be the main physical mechanism caused by US exposure [20, 21].
As the bubbles violently collapse, they release tiny shock waves, a phenomenon called acoustic cavitation.
Surface acoustic cavitation understood via nanosecond electrochemistry.
Researchers knew then that collapsing bubbles could create high temperatures and pressures, a phenomenon known as acoustic cavitation.
This type of cavitation is known as acoustic cavitation, (Franc, 2004).