acoustic cavitation


Also found in: Medical.

acoustic cavitation

[ə‚kü·stik ‚kav·ə′tā·shən]
(fluid mechanics)
The formation of vapor-filled bubbles in a liquid during the short periodic intervals of negative pressure, or tensile stress, that accompany the passage of a sound wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
The generation of acoustic cavitation in a liquid causes a series of mechanical, acoustical, optical and chemical effects.
This effect is known as acoustic cavitation (SN: 12/13/86, p.
Angiosonics develops technology that utilizes low frequency (20-100 kilohertz), high power ultrasound for therapeutic purposes by means of acoustic cavitation.
In the case of fruit fly larvae, researchers now suspect that the damage is done by a process called acoustic cavitation.
For acoustic cavitation to occur with the short pulses typically used in diagnostic ultrasound, bubbles about 1 micron across must be present in the fluid.
Crum of the University of Mississippi in University, probably produces an enormous amount of acoustic cavitation, which may play a role in destroying the stones and perhaps in damaging nearby tissue.
The nature of the damage indicates that acoustic cavitation rather than a heating effect is responsible for the destruction.
However, such localized effects also mean that acoustic cavitation and its effects would be difficult to detect.