acquired immunity


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acquired immunity

[ə′kwīrd ə′myün·ə·dē]
(immunology)
Resistance to a microbial or other antigenic substance taken on by a naturally susceptible individual; may be either active or passive.
References in periodicals archive ?
By considering both the impact of acquired immunity to a pathogen and the amount of a pathogen to which people are exposed, researchers have developed a novel approach for more accurately assessing the potential health risks of infectious diseases.
Placental Malaria Women, who have acquired immunity against malaria during childhood, nevertheless become susceptible to malaria again during their first pregnancies.
A Massachusetts General Hospital study showed LTBI, in the era prior to INH availability, afforded a 79 percent reduction in subsequent TB re-infection as a consequence of acquired immunity.
added "Another important aspect of our study is that we show these PfEMP1 domain cassettes are recognized by natural acquired immunity in young African children, which gives us hope that we can base a vaccine on the discovered PfEMP1 types.
Having had the condition countless times as a child, she thought she would be protected by so-called acquired immunity and did not take any medication before her journey.
It is assumed that the use of high-throughput assays like protein microarrays may offer opportunity to identify antigens that either alone or in combination, function as targets of natural acquired immunity against malaria infections.
Prior to this case, five cases of survival following rabies had been well documented, but all received occupationally related preexposure rabies vaccination or postexposure prophylaxis; this is the first known patient to survive with only naturally acquired immunity.
Other variables that might restrict Lyme disease incidence include prompt removal of attached ticks before the pathogen is transmitted and acquired immunity to the salivary proteins of these ticks, the spirochetal pathogen, or both (7-11).
The second feature is the protection conferred to a host after exposure to a pathogen, that is, acquired immunity.
The importance of acquired immunity to explain the difference in morbidity and mortality rates between long-time residents in yellow fever-prone localities in West Africa on the one hand and, on the other, among adolescent and adult strangers coming in (who had not been in a position to acquire immunity as little children) was insisted upon as early as 1910/11 by the then head of the Liverpool University Yellow Fever Bureau, Sir Rubert Boyce.
This shows that acquired immunity against ESC is long-lasting at either 78.
TLR recognize distinct Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns ("PAMP"), such as LPS, CpG DNA or double-stranded RNA and play a crucial role in the induction of acquired immunity as well as innate immunity.

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