acrasia


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acrasia

[ə′krā·zē·ə]
(psychology)
Lack of self-control.

Acrasia

self-indulgent in the pleasures of the senses. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
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References in periodicals archive ?
But if we break down that word power a little, question the terms of the syllogism, redefine it with a lot less violence, then Guyon's sparing of Acrasia can be something completely different.
In D2, Price offers a "traditional" (286) interpretation of Aristotle on acrasia (especially NE 1146b-1147b).
The weak creature enters an abysmal darkness, as if in the clutches of Acrasia in her Bower of Bliss, whereas the chosen person becomes Sir Guyon reaching the apex of light in his quest for truth.
Asleep in Titania's arms, Bottom is comically reminiscent of knightly heroes who are unmanned by a female temptress, such as Verdant in book 2 of Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene (1596) who becomes the lover of Acrasia and lays "a slombering, / In secret shade, after long wanton ioyes.
Verdant has been seduced by the enchantress Acrasia, and sleeps heavily throughout the episode that Floyd-Wilson and Sullivan discuss; he thus nicely fulfills his task of crystallizing issues of bodily regimen, temperance, the fluidity of the body, and so on.
31) Patricia Parker has pointed out, furthermore, that the Israelites' harps (sometimes translated as "instruments") hanging on Babylonian trees also lie behind the suspended, and impotent, weapons of the knight Verdant -- "His warlike armes, the idle instruments/ Of sleeping praise, were hong upon a tree" -- the victim of the Enchantress Acrasia in book 2 of The Faerie Queene.