acrolein


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acrolein

[ə′krōl·ē·ən]
(organic chemistry)
CH2=CHCHO A colorless to yellow liquid with a pungent odor and a boiling point of 52.7°C; soluble in water, alcohol, and ether; used in organic synthesis, pharmaceuticals manufacture, and as an herbicide and tear gas.
References in periodicals archive ?
A) p53 and p21 proteins in HFL-1 cells cultured in the absence (-) or presence (+) of 25 [micro]M acrolein for 1, 2, or 3 days.
This report presents a new Acrolein industry project analysis covering SWOT, investment feasibility analysis as well as investment return analysis with related research conclusions and development trend analysis of China and Global Acrolein industry.
The concentrations of some aldehydes, especially acrolein, appear to change over a short time (a few days), even when refrigerated.
Previous studies by this research team found that neuronal death caused by acrolein can be prevented by administering the drug hydralazine, an FDA-approved medication used to treat hypertension.
Lumber dry kilns were particularly problematic in qualifying for this option because of small amounts of acrolein and the lack of a single discharge point.
Acrolein and phenol were "no detects" for the entire 4-week trial.
acrolein, crotonaldehyde) of various foods and additional carbonyl, aldehyde, and ketone derivatives are produced during cooking fats, oils, and sugars.
George noted that, "Cell membranes that are oxidized also produce reactive derivatives, such as Acrolein, that can damage the cysteines.
Upregulation of endothelial heme oxygenase-1 expression through the activation of the JNK pathway by sublethal concentrations of acrolein.
Stop smoking It's not just your lungs that will benefit when you quit - cigarettes contain a chemical called acrolein, which stops HDL from doing its work of escorting cholesterol away from the arteries.
By comparing measured VOC concentrations to published odor thresholds, sensory irritation levels derived for the general population, and noncancer chronic health guidelines, Hodgson and Levin (2003) detected acrolein and formaldehyde as priority targets for residences.
Methanol, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, propionaldehyde, and phenol are listed as "total HAPs" for the PCWP NESHAP ruling (EPA 2006b).