acrylamide


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acrylamide

[ə′kril·ə‚mīd]
(organic chemistry)
CH2CHCONH2 Colorless, odorless crystals with a melting point of 84.5°C; soluble in water, alcohol, and acetone; used in organic synthesis, polymerization, sewage treatment, ore processing, and permanent press fabrics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like so many microscopic magnets, these acrylamide compounds cling to soils and are not keen to migrate with water flow.
Beef mince has a high surface area which would allow acrylamide to form if the appropriate precursor chemicals were present," the authors say.
And longer cooking times can increase the amount of acrylamide in foods further.
The acrylamide typically found in the human diet appears to be "effectively detoxified" the researchers conclude.
Food that was cooked at lower temperatures seemed to have lower acrylamide content, and boiling foods was preferable to baking or frying them at higher temperatures.
We started Avanti in 1978 and I wanted to show up at my first NASSCO meeting with a keg of acrylamide chemical grout
Metabolism, toxicokinetics and hemoglobin adduct formation in rat following subacute and subchronic acrylamide dosing.
The inner oil phase was first emulsified in the water phase containing acrylamide and PS particles.
The final products were analyzed for acrylamide using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.
Increasing the roasting degree led to a decrease in acrylamide concentration, as well as radical scavenging capacity," wrote Carmelina Summa, from the EC's Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements.
Acrylamide forms in frying, roasting and baking where there are high temperatures and low moisture.
The FDA allows Vibrio vulnificus bacteria in Gulf Coast shellfish to kill about 20 people each year, permits the sale of fish that are highly contaminated with mercury, and fails to restrict cancer-causing acrylamide contaminants in foods.