excited state

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Excited state

In quantum mechanics, a stationary state of higher energy than the lowest stationary state or ground state of a particle or a system of particles. Customarily, only bound stationary states, which generally are at most denumerably infinite in number, are spoken of as excited, although the formal quantum theory often treats the noncountable unbound stationary states on an equal footing with the bound states. See Ground state, Metastable state

excited state

See energy level; excitation.

excited state

[ek′sīd·əd ′stāt]
(quantum mechanics)
A stationary state of higher energy than the lowest stationary state or ground state of a particle or system of particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the temperature is increased rapidly, the conversion from the deactivated state to the activated state is increased.
The MetaProbe compounds transform from a diagnostically inactive state to an activated state only in response to highly specific interactions with molecules active in human disease.
Designed to support very fast digital transmission of text, images, voice and video over ordinary twisted-pair wire, this device has a high-transmission performance of 6km (19,685ft) and has decreased power consumption over earlier devices with an average of 250mW in activated state, and only 18mW in deactivated state.
The resulting carbon, in its activated state as produced with USDA AARC funding, is highly adsorbent and can be combined with co-products of the process to form a slow-release nitrogen fertilizer.
Preclinical work building on systemic administration has confirmed that not only can 'magnetic' SEPREHVIR-armed macrophages be successfully guided by MRI from the circulation to target tumor sites, but they arrive in an activated state capable of directly attacking tumor cells.
The lymphocytes that infiltrate nasal polyps have been identified as predominantly memory T cells in an activated state, and these cells produce a mixed cytokine pattern of T1 helper (Th1) and T2 helper (Th2) cells.
This chronically activated state, termed exhaustion, is an immunological hallmark of chronic viral infections, such as HIV.