adamantine spar

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adamantine spar

[‚ad·ə′man‚tēn ′spär]
(mineralogy)
A silky brown variety of corundum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hetaera": She casts upon the world a spell, / in order to possess in full / her lip's melodious distill; / an adamantine villanelle.
Thomas More became for [him] a man with an adamantine sense of his own self.
That the Cushing copy came from New England strongly suggests ties between Kipling and Glaser, who was a New Englander, though the British writer's adamantine reticence about his private life furnishes nothing that is otherwise supportive of this possibility.
He should follow Geoff Boycott's example and stick to being his dour, adamantine self and tell the BBC that if they don't like it they can lump it.
The Order of the Scales is Book III in THE MEMORY OF FLAMES and is a recommended pick for prior readers of the series who began with THE ADAMANTINE PALACE and followed THE KING OF CRAGS.
69) In Blake's The Four Zoas, the adamantine chains are "rattling," a movement that Smith alludes to (drolly) when Kiki responds to Howard's teasing and wet kiss on the cheek by laughing "deeply, shaking everything on her.
His manipulation of the audience is remarkable and his voice (which sounds as though it will break any minute) is enough to draw you in with adamantine concentration.
three folds were brass, / Three iron, three of adamantine rock" (II.
Leider was speaking of a "new distance," a remove, which he saw manifested in the adamantine surfaces of the work of the Ferus Gallery artists and which came to stand for LA culture as a whole.
Toutefois, le recours au notaire n'est pas lie de maniere adamantine a l'impulsion des juridictions britanniques, ce qui laisse a penser que cette position cle des notaires est egalement reconnue par la population.
The political intrigue in The Dragon's Path isn't as brutal as that in The Adamantine Palace by Stephen Deas, but the players are much more likeable here and what intrigue there is, is well-played.
In the poet's presentation of the Maiden there is necessarily an abstract, adamantine quality: the fact that she is a figure translated into something other than the human child and that the world she inhabits is one where human rules no longer apply have to be represented by an absence of human feeling and of a sense of earthly relationships.