adamite


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adamite

[′ad·ə‚mīt]
(mineralogy)
Zn2(AsO4)(OH) A colorless, white, or yellow mineral consisting of basic zinc arsenate, crystallizing in the orthorhombic system; hardness is 3.5 on Mohs scale, and specific gravity is 4.34-4.35.
References in periodicals archive ?
The plurality of the races, and the distinctive character of the Adamite species, Anthropological Review, Vol.
races could Location have originated anywhere, but Adamite races in the Middle East.
Further the letter of Jan Zizka describing Adamite practices.
The best example is the Taborite Adamites who wanted to draw the early communist ideals out to their logical conclusion.
He assumes that only Adam and Eve were created "in God's image," and only Adamites were "capable of achieving God's kingdom," whereas non-Adamites only obtain this accountability through hearing the biblical message, and their participation in God's image depends on faith in the Messiah.
He claims that those Adamites would have replaced all non-Adamites.
But our religious history could have been very different if we'd ever been visited by the Adamites, a group of early Christian nudists who believed that every act of sex was a profound prayer.
Sadly, the Adamites died out centuries ago (having prayed themselves to exhaustion), and their disappearance reminds me of the mythical wibbly-wobbly bird, whose foreskin was connected to its eyelids.
At the end of the first, the Adamites burnt their libraries before joining their brethren in preparation for the Apocalypse, so as not to carry useless wisdom into the promised Kingdom of Heaven.
Instead of thinking in terms of regression from a golden to an iron age, the narrator proposes we think of paradise as the present in which we live, since any speculation of the no-longer or the not-yet destroys the enjoyment of the here and now, where the Middle Ages placed the sensual pleasures of the Adamites and modern restaurants serve up "Paradise chops.
In this context, Alexander Winchell's Adamites and Preadamites (1878) provides a theological North Star by which others might navigate a path that harmonizes the natural sciences and the Bible.
That book, Adamites and Pre-Adamites, was published in 1878, yet Winchell had come out as a proponent of evolution nearly four years earlier, when he published a book called The Doctrine of Evolution.