addictive disorder

addictive disorder

[a′dik·tiv dis′ȯr·dər]
(psychology)
A disorder characterized by the chronic use of an agent and resulting in the development of tolerance, physical dependence, and finally drug-seeking behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
Veterans with a coexisting addictive disorder tended to be younger.
Unfortunately, pain management specialists often ignore the addictive disorder, while addictionologists may ignore the pain.
Managing a pain condition can be a very challenging process, but it becomes even more difficult when a coexisting addictive disorder is also present.
This is my response to the mistaken notion that "borderlines" with an addictive disorder are not treatable.
Increasing block grant appropriations offers one avenue in trying to reconcile the large gap between those diagnosed with an addictive disorder and those in treatment.
The shelter provides case management, addictive disorder programs, basic medical care, mental health screening, job training, showers, food and a place to sleep.
Given these links, school counselors need tools to determine whether their students' academic or personal concerns are the result of an underlying addictive disorder.
While the prognosis for an addictive disorder is often very guarded, this myth raises the question of what constitutes a successfully treated addict.
All efforts will be made to assist the nurse with an addictive disorder to seek treatment and return to workforce.
Now we learn 120 years on that Ludwig II was suffering from a rare disorder, compulsive palace building -- or CPB, an addictive disorder similar to gambling, kleptomania, compulsive shopping or cleaning.