address part

address part

[′ad·res ‚pärt]
(computer science)
That part of a computer instruction which contains the address of the operand, of the result, or of the next instruction.
References in periodicals archive ?
This technology would still require additional funding to fully develop, but if successful, would address part of the unrecoverable oil market.
It's like adding an alarm system in your home even though you have adequate locks -- either one will address part of the need, but you only get the maximum benefit from using the two together in a system solution.
This technology is still in the proof of concept phase and would require additional funding to fully develop, but if successful, would address part of the unrecoverable oil market.
While some measures have been taken to date to address part of the budget problems, the scope of the remaining problem will necessitate extreme measures broadly outlined today in a press conference.
This technology is in the proof of concept phase and would require additional funding to develop, but if successful, would address part of the unrecoverable oil market.
To notify your interest and get access to any documents, you must copy and paste the link below into the address part on your browser.
Bullying is big part of them but we will also address part of them but we will also address issues such as sectarianism and issues such as sectarianism and violence.
6 million for the Texas Facilities Commission to address part of a long list of pressing maintenance issues in state buildings.
He added: "Government could address part of the working poor problem immediately.
He added that the board of trustees has formed five ad hoc teams to address part of the foundation stage missions.
Employers, with the support of organisations like TTE, can address part of the issue through initiatives like the Enhanced Learning Credits Scheme and our adult apprenticeship.
To address part of the disposal problem, in 1980, Congress made the states responsible for disposing of most low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), and allowed them to form regional compacts and to restrict access to disposal facilities from noncompact states.