address

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address

1. Computing a number giving the location of a piece of stored information
2. Brit Government a statement of the opinions or wishes of either or both Houses of Parliament that is sent to the sovereign
3. the alignment or position of a part, component, etc., that permits correct assembly or fitting

Address

 

in computers, a code specifying the location of information in an electronic computer. True addresses are specific codes corresponding to numbers (of a unit or device) of data storage locations. Relative addresses are numbers of memory locations counted from some specially selected location, which is most often the one in which the instruction containing the relative address is stored. Symbolic addresses are those used for convenience in programming. Relative and symbolic addresses are converted into true addresses either manually, after the entire program has been written and checked, or automatically within the computer by special programs. In the computer, the address is converted by a decoder into a system of control signals which give access to the storage locations corresponding to the given address. Most computers have capabilities for circuit conversion of the address while an instruction is in the process of being carried out. An address arriving at a decoder is called an input address, and an address extracted from the computer memory as part of an instruction is called an output address, or simply an address.

address

[′ad·res]
(computer science)
The number or name that uniquely identifies a register, memory location, or storage device in a computer.

address

(networking)

address

(networking)

address

(networking)

address

(storage, programming)
An unsigned integer used to select one fundamental element of storage, usually known as a word from a computer's main memory or other storage device. The CPU outputs addresses on its address bus which may be connected to an address decoder, cache controller, memory management unit, and other devices.

While from a hardware point of view an address is indeed an integer most strongly typed programming languages disallow mixing integers and addresses, and indeed addresses of different data types. This is a fine example for syntactic salt: the compiler could work without it but makes writing bad programs more difficult.

address

(1) The number of a particular memory or peripheral storage location. Like post office boxes, each byte of memory and each disk sector has its own unique address. Programs are compiled into machine language, which references actual addresses in the computer.

(2) As a verb, to manage or work with. For example, "the computer can address 16GB of memory."

(3) The location of a website or other Internet facility. See URL, IP address and address bar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, two types of communication tactics are differentiated: evaluation production (positive or negative) tactics, used by the addresser as the evaluation subject and reaction to evaluation (positive or negative) tactics, used by the addressee as the evaluation object.
Every letter, once it has been received, constitutes a new moment or event in the relationship between the addresser and the addressee.
16) Coexistent with any self-focused message, according to Jakobson, is ambiguity, which extends from the message itself to include the addresser and addressee, resulting in a "quasi-quoted discourse' (p.
According to Jakobson, the emotive function focuses on the relationship of the addresser to the message.
Person deixis, on the other hand, involves references to the roles of addresser and addressee in communication and includes, in English, the first and second-person pronouns "I," "we.
Since addresser and addressee are the same person, the only variable in inner speech is time.
Dividing the speech act into six parts--the addresser, the message, the addressee, the context of the message, the contact through which it is made, and the code in which it is delivered--he attributes a "function" to each: the emotive for the addresser, the conative for the addressee, the referential for the context, the phatic for the contact, the metalingual for the code.
This seems to imply that in the initial part and the final part of the judgment, the judge plays the role of an addresser, and in the middle part he attempts to anticipate the reactions of the addressee to his opinions and gives reasons for possible need for explanation and justification.
The orientation of the sentences, their connotative function plays a more important role than their denotative message; the "what" of the information conveyed becomes secondary to the "how" of communication, bound to the subjective positions of addresser and addressee, even if these are inscribed in a text which appears as scrupulously impersonal.
The realisations of self mention and engagement markers in my corpus are closely related to the speech roles identified by Halliday and Hasan (1976: 45), that is, addresser and addressee.
The addresser and the addressee in literary communication are temporally, locally and possibly culturally distanced.
What had been a coherently phrased apology for a lack of communication between addresser and addressee in Philip's letter, now turns, in the words of Elizabeth, into an exercise always passing underneath the signifier towards an anguished cry about a person beyond the reach of words: "Words no longer reach him, they shiver and shatter, it is as if (as if I say), it is as if he is guarded by a sheet of crystal" (p.