adenocarcinoma

(redirected from adenocarcinoma of the lung)
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adenocarcinoma:

see neoplasmneoplasm
or tumor,
tissue composed of cells that grow in an abnormal way. Normal tissue is growth-limited, i.e., cell reproduction is equal to cell death. Feedback controls limit cell division after a certain number of cells have developed, allowing for tissue repair
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adenocarcinoma

[¦ad·ən‚ō‚kär·sən′ō·mə]
(medicine)
A malignant tumor originating in glandular or ductal epithelium and tending to produce acinic structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
56-58) A poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung shows acinar and micropapillary patterns of growth (Figure 6, A) and expresses ROS1 (Figure 6, B), detected by using a rabbit monoclonal antibody against ROS1 (clone D4D6; Cell Signaling Technology).
Positron emission tomography in well differentiated fetal adenocarcinoma of the lung.
The youngest reported case of primary adenocarcinoma of the lung involved a 15 year old, leading researchers to believe that genetic mutation may play a role.
Prognostic value of K-ras mutations, ras oncoprotein, and c-erb B-2 oncoprotein expression in adenocarcinoma of the lung.
Because K-ras mutations are found in only 30% of the adenocarcinoma of the lung (4) and are rare in other solid tumors that frequently metastasize to the leptomeninges (7), additional molecular markers for the management of LMM are of potential interest (8, 9).
The single arm Phase II study evaluated the therapeutic agent EC145 and the molecular imaging agent EC20 in 42 patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung.
The second study is presented as a poster at ASCO and is a Phase 2 single-arm study conducted in patients with platinum-resistant and erlotinib-resistant adenocarcinoma of the lung (the most common type of non-small cell lung cancer).
c-K-ras, p53 mutations occur very early in adenocarcinoma of the lung.
2-5) This in turn has led expert panels to recommend that all new diagnoses of advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung be tested for EGFR and ALK.
Although there is a consensus on the necessity to test for EGFR and ALK in all cases of advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung, the identification of much rarer mutations that respond well to targeted therapies poses a more difficult question.